Hear the thunder

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
I feel stormy weather moving in
About to begin
Hear the thunder Don't you loose your head
Rip off the roof and stay in bed

It's Raining Men by The Weather Girls

I'm wondering if the phrase in bold is the indicative mood or imperative mood... (I think it's the former, that is, "I hear the thunder).
Thank you.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You can make an argument for either interpretation, Vik. Like you, I tend to think the singer is talking to herself rather than giving somebody else a command. However, the "you" in "Don't lose your head" could be directed to some unmentioned listener who the speaker is addressing.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hear the thunder Don't you loose your head (Shouldn't that be 'lose'?)
    Rip off the roof and stay in bed
    .

    As the verbs in red are in the imperative, the clever money is on "Hear" being in the imperative. I see the clauses as instructions.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Paul has a good point, Vik. If you really want to interpret the stanza as a comment in the indicative, you have to assume a number of missing words: (You) hear the thunder, (you) don't lose your head. (You let it) rip off the roof and stay in bed.

    I view the words as imperatives addressed to the singer herself: (I tell myself) Hear the thunder, don't lose your head, (let it) rip off the roof and stay in bed.
     
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