heart like granite/heart like flint

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I am translating something, and here is a part of it:

He has a heart like flint/granite.

I asked my American friend, he said both were idiomatic.

I wanted to say that "He is stone-hearted".

I am wondering if the two words are both idiomaitc? Or neither of them isn't idiomatic?

Thanks a lot
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I've never heard "a heart like granite" or "a heart like flint."

    "A heart of stone" is, however, a familiar expression. Someone who is cold and uncaring about the feelings of others may be said to have a heart of stone.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    A heart like granite/flint references 'a heart of stone' but emphasizes the hardness because both granite and flint are very hard minerals.

    As you are translating, you might like to consider, 'He has a heart of flint/granite' rather than 'He has a heart like flint/granite.'
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    A heart like granite/flint references 'a heart of stone' but emphasizes the hardness because both granite and flint are very hard minerals.

    As you are translating, you might like to consider, 'He has a heart of flint/granite' rather than 'He has a heart like flint/granite.'
    So "He has a heart of flint/granite" are acceptable in UK rather than USA?
     
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