heart

robbie_SWE

Senior Member
Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
Hi!

I've been thinking of the word "heart" and what it actually means. The Latin languages have chosen a word that idicates that the heart is the centre:

Ex: cuore (it.), coeur (fr.) corazón (sp.), coração, inima (ro.)

The Romanian word for heart is "inima", which means "soul" (or where the soul is).

How is it in your language? Does the word "heart" have another, more "romantic" meaning? ;)
 
  • Sina

    New Member
    Turco, Turquia
    Yürek = used when we are talking about being brave etc.
    Kalp = Biological usage and romantic
     

    ukuca

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Turkey
    In Turkish, there are also
    Can: which is more related to "soul"
    Gönül: which is more romantic and poetic

    Mostly, the word "Kalp" is used for centre of something
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Here's a list of numerous translations:
    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/heart

    "Heart" apparently comes from the Old English word 'heorte':
    From Germanic *xirtan, from Indo-European *k̑erd-. Cognate with Old Frisian herte, Ashkenazic herz, Old Saxon herta (Dutch hart), Old High German herza (German Herz), Old Norse hjarta (Swedish hjärta), Gothic removed. The IE root is also the source of Greek καρδία, Latin cor, Welsh craidd, Russian сердце, Lithuanian širdis.
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    The Russian word сердце (serdtse) might be related to the word середина (seredina) which means "centre, middle".
     

    Becker

    Member
    English
    In Sinhalese it's hada which is derived from the Sanskrit hridaya but I'm not too sure what exactly the Sanskrit term means beside "heart"
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    In sapnish you say Corazón if you want to refer to a feeling or to the biological part
    Te amo con todo el corazón.- I love oyu with all my heart
    Me falla el corazón.- My heart is not well

    In Spanish centre is centro
    Centro-corazón I don't know if there is a simility
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    robbie_SWE said:
    I've been thinking of the word "heart" and what it actually means. The Latin languages have chosen a word that idicates that the heart is the centre
    Surely it is the other way around: the heart is at the centre of the body, and therefore stands as a metaphor for the centre of other things.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As French4beth has said, the Romance, Germanic and Slavonic words for heart are all cognates; and I would hazard a guess that the Sanksrit hridaya is cognate too.

    The Germanic h = Latin k = Slavonic s is seen in many words

    hundred - centum -sto
    house - casa -
    head - caput -
    heart - cordis - serdtse
    harm - carmen (a magic spell)
    hemp - cannabis
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Becker said:
    In Sinhalese it's hada which is derived from the Sanskrit hridaya but I'm not too sure what exactly the Sanskrit term means beside "heart"
    The word hriday is still used...I have seen it in the some prayers in Panjabi (hirday) and it is still used in Hindi and Gujarati (according to one of my friends), but not often. The more common word is of Persian origin, dil.
     

    D0lph1n

    New Member
    Indonesia
    hmm, indonesian translated heart as "hati" (in terms of feeling)

    however, "hati" in an indonesian saying it in biological terms is actually goes for "liver", weird isn't it ?? :confused:

    so for "heart" in biological term we use "jantung" or sometimes we adding it as "jantung hati"

    expression that using "hati"
    "makan hati" (literally means eat your own heart) if you are angry over something
    "hati hati" means "be careful" or "watch out !"

    as for romantic meaning, well, we mostly use the translation from english, such as "broken heart" (patah hati), "key to my heart" (kunci untuk hatiku), etc etc
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Well, Linguist, the girl who told me this was talking about folk music, so perhaps the persian influence is not as strong there. There are a lot of words that sound so weird to me, living outside of India of course, and so I take them as being weird and unused. But I ask my parents and it seems second nature...and I get a responce like "oh...yeah...that means 'such and such.'"

    If you don't mind, ek kaam karna mere liye...ask your parents if that is a village term where they're from. Im interested to know:)
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    Becker said:
    In Sinhalese it's hada which is derived from the Sanskrit hridaya but I'm not too sure what exactly the Sanskrit term means beside "heart"
    Hridaya in Thai (pronounced Hreudai) means heart too. The best way to give an example of this is .... there is a convent church in Bangkok called the Sacret Heart or something but its Thai name is Phra Hridaya Convent
    (Phra is an honorific article).

    We also use the word Chitra (in Thai we pronounced it as Chit, the -ra is silent) means heart but its closer to the word mano- in Sanskrit, as in mind.

    The physical heart is called "huachai" in Thai.
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    In Thai mana- turns into mano- for sandhi combination

    eg.

    manobhab มโนภาพ- mana มน + bhava ภาวะ= means something like ... you know lol... what bhava means in Sanskrit ... hard to explain for me. It's like what you imagine in your mind.

    manodhamm มโนธรรม - mana มน + dharma ธรรมะ = your inner dharma, I guess, hard to translate for me.
     

    Lore bat

    Member
    Mundua
    Miguelillo 87 said:
    In sapnish you say Corazón if you want to refer to a feeling or to the biological part
    Te amo con todo el corazón.- I love oyu with all my heart
    Me falla el corazón.- My heart is not well

    In Spanish centre is centro
    Centro-corazón I don't know if there is a simility
    In Spanish "corazón" is used as "centre". For example, "el corazón de la ciudad" (the centre of the city). The example that the RAE gives is "corazón de la manzana".

    :)
     

    anthodocheio

    Senior Member
    In Greece the word is καρδιά (cardiá) and has the same uses like those you have mention.
    The human heart and the romantic use and the center like mentioned before; the heart of the city or of the cabbage.
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    panjabigator said:
    anubhav-experience
    Anubhab in Thai means potential and its another word for power

    อนุภาพ I never quite understand the combination of this word since I was a kid. anu อนุ- to me it is a prefix for something small, and bhava ภาวะ- to me means the same as rupa-รูป as in picture (in Thai the word picture is rupbhab รูปภาพ) so I used to think it means a small picture or something like that back when I was like 6-7.
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek heart is «καρδιά» [kar.ðiˈʲa] (fem.) which is the Classical fem. noun «καρδίᾱ» kărdíā with synizesis (PIE *ḱēr(d)-/*ḱrd-(i)os- an old IE word for heart retained in many languages: Hitt. kēr, Lat. cor, Skt. हृदय (hṛdaya), Proto-Germanic *hertô etc).
    For the ancient Greeks «καρδία» was the seat of feeling and passion and the centre of the human mind.
    For the Christian Greek thinkers of the late Hellenistic era, it was also the focal point of the human soul which when cleansed of sin is able to perceive God ("Theoria").
    Jesus Christ in the early Christian literature often bears the epithet «καρδιογνώστης» kărdĭŏgnṓstēs (masc.) < «καρδία» + «γνώστης» gnṓstēs (masc.) --> one who knows (from the v. «γνωρίζω» gnōrízō).
    Centre in MoGr is «κέντρο» [ˈcen.drɔ] (neut.) < Classical neut. «κέντρον» kéntrŏn --> lit. sting, later also (geometry) leg of a compass, centre of circle < Classical v. «κεντέω/κεντῶ» kĕntéō (uncontracted)/kĕntô (contracted) --> to sting, goad (PIE *ḱent- to sting cf Ltv. sīts, hunting spear, Proto-Germanic *handa- > OHG hantag, pointed; the Latin centrum is borrowed from Greek).
    So, no relation between «καρδία» & «κέντρον».
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    In a metaphoric way, English often tends to use "core" rather than "heart" meaning "center"
    The core of an apple/ a pear / a cabbage
    The core of the earth
    The core of the problem/ issue
    The city core
    The hard core
    The core group, the core members
     

    Welsh_Sion

    New Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Welsh:

    calon (n.f.) [KAHlonn]

    - medically, romantically and the idea of courage/bravery

    We also use gwraidd (n.f.) [grayedh]

    for the idea of being 'at the heart of sth' (lit. 'at the root of something')
     

    Abu Rashid

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    In the Semitic languages the root is l-b-b and it means kernel/core.

    In Arabic there's q-l-b which has the meaning of to fluctuate, flip-flop, as the heart beats. There is some suggestion this is a derived tri-consontal root from the above originally bi-consontal root with the addition of the initial q.

    In Persain we say : قلب ( Qalb )
    Mostly, the word "Kalp" is used for centre of something
    These are from the Arabic for heart.
     
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