Heave a-hoy!

minitradu

New Member
Muchos!!
Hi!
I would like to know the Spanish translation for this expression: 'Heave a-hoy!' which is used for sailors in vessels when they are hauling the shipment to the boat.
Thanks very much for your help!
 
  • cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi!
    I would like to know the Spanish translation for this expression: 'Heave a-hoy!' which is used for sailors in vessels when they are hauling the shipment to the boat.
    I can't say I have ever heard heave ahoy. Where did you come across it? Do you mean heave ho?
     

    alberto magnani

    Senior Member
    Italia italiano
    Heave=to raise or lift, especially with great effort or force.
    A-hoy= used to hail a ship or a person or to attract attention.
    (The American Heritage (R) Dictionary of the English Language.
    Fourth Edition copyright 2000 (C) by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Updated in 2003.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company).
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'm still not convinced this is a phrase a native speaker would use. Ahoy tends to mean look at or I can see. It's fairly archaic and tends to be used in the stock phrase ship ahoy. I doubt very much anyone really says it as anything but a joke because it sounds so corny, something out of a black and white film.

    Look at me/ us heaving something up doesn't really make sense because the people doing the heaving don't need to be told that's what they are doing.
     
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