heavily as it rained

layman9

Senior Member
vietnamese
1. Because of the heavy rain, the game was put off for a few days
A. Heavily as it rained, the game was put off for a few days
B. Heavy as it rained, the game was put off for a few days
C. Because it rained heavy, the game put off for a few days.
D. Because it rained heavily, the game put off for a few days.
I have to choose a sentence from the options A, B, C or D which is the closest in meaning to 1 but I cant identify the correct answer.
Does A have the same meaning to: Although it rained heavily, the game was put off for a few days.
Please help me. Thank you very much.
 
  • bennymix

    Senior Member
    C and D are both missing a word: 'was' after 'game.'

    D, revised, is correct. It's hard to make sense of A or B.

    A perhaps could be revised to A*. As heavily as it rained, the game was put off for a few days. This is grammatical, but puzzling.

    Looking at C and D: 'heavily' fits and 'heavy' does not, hence D (revised).

    D*. Because it rained heavily, the game was put off for a few days.:tick:
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1. Because of the heavy rain, the game was put off for a few days
    A. Heavily as it rained, the game was put off for a few days
    B. Heavy as it rained, the game was put off for a few days
    C. Because it rained heavy, the game put off for a few days.
    D. Because it rained heavily, the game put off for a few days.
    I have to choose a sentence from the options A, B, C or D which is the closest in meaning to 1 but I cant identify the correct answer.
    Does A have the same meaning to: Although it rained heavily, the game was put off for a few days.
    Please help me. Thank you very much.
    Hello Layman.

    You're right that Heavily as it rained means Although it rained heavily. This is a concessive formula.

    Thus one could say Heavily as it rained, the game was not put off:tick:, but not Heavily as it rained, the game was put off. I'm assuming that heavy rain would be likely to cause the game to be cancelled, of course. The objection to the second sentence is logical, not grammatical.

    If you change the word order and say As it rained heavily, you change the meaning to Because it rained heavily, so you could say As it rained heavily, the game was put off:tick:.
     
    Last edited:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would be more comfortable if the verb "rain" were in the Past Continuous. Am I wrong?

    GS :)
    The simple past as bennymix suggests is quite correct, as would be the past continuous.

    If the past continuous (note lack of capitalization) increases your comfort level, by all means use it. ;)

    This site suggests that the simple past is the usual way of expressing an action completed in the past.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I do see the point of Giorgio's question. There is a slight difference. Past indicates the rains stopped; the games don't proceed though, perhaps because of clean up. Past continuous says, "The rain was coming down and they didn't want to play in the rain." That, in real life, is perhaps more likely.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    My dismally out-of-date brain gets confused with newfangled grammar terms and I confused "past continuous" with "past perfect." :eek:

    Apologies

    "Because it had rained heavily, the game was put off for a few days" might also work, but we have no idea from the suggested text whether it was still raining when the decision was made to postpone the game.




     
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