heavy v. massive v. powerful v. strong [massive tax program]

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hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
"A massive tax and governmental reform program approved by the 28th legislature culminated in the november general election."

I have problem with the meaning and alternative meanings of "massive" used in this context.

Which of the followings have the same meaning as the original has and are idiomatic?

1) "A strong tax and governmental reform program approved by the 28th legislature culminated in the november general election."

2) "A heavy tax and governmental reform program approved by the 28th legislature culminated in the november general election."

3) "A powerful tax and governmental reform program approved by the 28th legislature culminated in the november general election."

Source: Year Book Covering the Year ...

My idea: I think all of them correct by meaning and grammer but even the original is not idiomatic. I think the only idiomatic one is "a strong tax and govermental ..." i.e first of the alternatives.

Thank you
Thank you.
 
  • hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I don't think any of them have the same meaning. Massive is in the WR dictionary:
    But if something large in scale, amount, or degree then it is strong or powerful, and for this context probably heavvy.

    In The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English [Oxford University Press] massive means :

    1) large heavy and solid

    2) (of the features) strong and heavy-looking as a massive forehead.

    2nd meaning seems fit for the original.

    Thank you.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    I agree with dermott. None of your alternatives can replace the original. Note that it is the scale of the reform which is being described as massive. We do not use powerful, strong or heavy to describe a scale. It needs to be a word like "large".
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I agree with dermott. None of your alternatives can replace the original. Note that it is the scale of the reform which is being described as massive. We do not use powerful, strong or heavy to describe a scale. It needs to be a word like "large".
    What does scale refer to for this context? Is it a big way in which something appear or effect or is it a extensive effect of something?

    Thank you.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    This is talking about a reform - a modification. A large modification means that there are many changes, or that the effect of the change makes a big difference to the rules.
     
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