Hebt u / Heeft u

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
a/ Hebt u kinderen?
b/ Heeft u kinderen?

According to my textbook both sentences are correct but I bet there must be some difference. Is there any difference? I mean, formal, informal, less common, regional? thanks a lot.
 
  • Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    a/ Hebt u kinderen?
    b/ Heeft u kinderen?

    According to my textbook both sentences are correct but I bet there must be some difference. Is there any difference? I mean, formal, informal, less common, regional? thanks a lot.

    Both (a) and (b) are correct. The difference lies in the degree of formality.
    'U heeft' ('3rd person) is considered to be more formal than 'u hebt' (2nd person).

    The (hi)story of 'u' is quite a tricky and interesting one (see for example here).

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    I would just like to add that I have never heard 'U hebt' used in spoken Dutch. (I can only speak for the Netherlands, not Belgium)

    Wow, okay, interesting. And a bit surprising :). Then I have to add that my previous message deals with Dutch as spoken in Flanders.

    I also found some extra (rather prescriptive*) information concerning 'u hebt / u heeft', 'u is / u bent' etc. (but all about the situation in Flanders and all in Dutch, alas).


    Groetjes,

    Frank

    * hence to be taken with a pinch of salt :D.
     

    Lopes

    Senior Member
    Dutch (Amsterdam)
    I would just like to add that I have never heard 'U hebt' used in spoken Dutch. (I can only speak for the Netherlands, not Belgium)

    I think frases like 'hebt u misschien..' are quite normal.

    Plus, I'd say that it is only possible to say 'kunt u/u kunt' (second person), and not 'kan u/u kan' (third person)
     

    AllegroModerato

    Senior Member
    Dutch (Netherlands)
    No one ever says hebt u, even not hebt u misschien,
    I always say: heeft u misschien,
    but maybe all the Dutch-people speak their language wrong?

    Neither option is wrong, although I would agree that in Holland it is more common to hear "u heeft". In written contexts, on the other hand, "u hebt" is very much on the surge.

    I would just like to add that I have never heard 'U hebt' used in spoken Dutch. (I can only speak for the Netherlands, not Belgium)

    Really? I am surprised as well.

    Furthermore, I agree with Frank06 as regards the degree of formality. "U heeft" sounds a bit more formal to my ear. In any case, both options are fine and I wouldn´t worry too much about it.
     
    Then you must have a very selective ear.
    I am a native Dutch speaker. So you say I'm saying it wrong? I guess you must have some reliable source on which you are basing your opinion.

    Ik ben ook Nederlands. Ik zeg niet dat je het fout hebt, ik zeg dat ik nog nooit iemand heb horen zeggen: 'hebt u' een tasje? Dit klinkt als een fout die kleine kinderen maken.
    Zelf ben ik op deze site gekomen doordat mij spellingscontrole zei dat ik mijn zin niet goed begon. Ik schreef: U heeft, mijn spellingscontrole zij dat het 'U hebt' moest zijn. Ik wilde graag weten of dit nou klopte of niet.
    Maar nu vraag ik mij af zegt u zelf wel eens: 'Hebt u...?' Ik niet.

    I'm sorry, I'll try to translate it in English:

    I'm also Dutch and I don't say you're mistaking, I say I've never heard someone saying 'Hebt u' een tasje? It sounds so bad like a 4-year old child is speaking to you.
    I found this site, when my spellcheck(?) said my sentence was incorrect. I wrote: 'U heeft' and the corrector said it needed to be: 'U hebt.' I wanted to be sure if that was right and that I was wrong, but I found out it's: 'Heeft u'
    But now I'm wondering do you say sometimes: 'Hebt u...?' I don't.
     

    AllegroModerato

    Senior Member
    Dutch (Netherlands)
    Dominique, je spreekt jezelf een beetje tegen. Eerst zeg je "maybe all Dutch people speak their language wrong". Daarna "Ik zeg niet dat je het fout hebt....", om vervolgens te zeggen "Dit klinkt als een fout die kleine kinderen maken." :confused:

    Maar om een eind te maken aan je twijfels: "U hebt" is correct Nederlands, ook al vindt je het raar klinken en ook al is "heeft u" in de Hollandse spreektaal gebruikelijker.
     
    Ik zeg: misschien spreken Nederlanders hun taal dus niet goed. Dus ik bedoelde niet dat je het fout hebt alleen dat het ww hebben (bijna) nooit zo gebruikt wordt. Als iemand tegen mij zou zeggen 'hebt u...?' zal ik die persoon raar aankijken aangezien (bijna) niemand dit zegt.
    Maar mijn vraag blijft: 'Zegt u wel eens, 'hebt u..?'?
     

    AllegroModerato

    Senior Member
    Dutch (Netherlands)
    Peterdg heeft in zijn post aangegeven dat hij dus wel "hebt u" gebruikt (So you say I am saying it wrong?). Vandaar dat ik me een beetje verbaas over deze vraag van jouw richting hem.

    Dus ik bedoelde niet dat je het fout hebt alleen dat het ww hebben (bijna) nooit zo gebruikt wordt.
    Dat is dus niet waar. Om niet in herhaling te vallen raad ik je aan om de hele discussie nog eens goed door te lezen.
     

    Lopes

    Senior Member
    Dutch (Amsterdam)
    Ik zeg: misschien spreken Nederlanders hun taal dus niet goed. Dus ik bedoelde niet dat je het fout hebt alleen dat het ww hebben (bijna) nooit zo gebruikt wordt. Als iemand tegen mij zou zeggen 'hebt u...?' zal ik die persoon raar aankijken aangezien (bijna) niemand dit zegt.
    Maar mijn vraag blijft: 'Zegt u wel eens, 'hebt u..?'?

    Ja
     

    digitalnormie

    New Member
    English - USA
    a/ Hebt u kinderen?
    b/ Heeft u kinderen?

    According to my textbook both sentences are correct but I bet there must be some difference. Is there any difference? I mean, formal, informal, less common, regional? thanks a lot.
    Thank you all for this dialogue. I was looking for the correct conjugation for "do you have" to use in Amsterdam when speaking to people that I don't know such as a shopkeeper. Based on all of your posts, and where each of you live geographically, this is my conclusion regarding a/ vs. b/:

    • The forms "hebt u" and "heeft u" are BOTH correct colloquially in some areas.
    • Belgians commonly use "hebt u" and native Dutch people living in larger cities are very familiar with that conjugation. Urban native Dutch use "hebt u" and it doesn't sound strange and neither does "heeft u."
    • It is likely that native Dutch speakers living in the Netherlands that are situated outside of a large city and further from Belgium probably do not use "hebt u" and might find it a strange conjugation because their colloquial Dutch is more rules-based. And, if a visiting foreigner comes to the Netherlands, then that person should understand that they should speak more formally and use "heeft u" just to be on the safe side when going outside of an urban area.
    • Perhaps "hebt u" becomes more common in the Netherlands as you get closer to Belgium.
    Thanks again. It seems like either conjugation works for my needs for this upcoming trip.
     
    Top