Heia

Kuestenwache

Senior Member
German-Germany
Hi,
in Germany we sometimes say "Heia machen" or "in die Heia gehen" for "to go to sleep". We use this term especially when talking to small children. I now learned, that it is similar (or the same) in Czech and I was wondering whether there are other languages that use it or something similar, and whether someone knows the origin of this word.
Any ideas welcome :)
 
  • ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Hello,

    It's similar, but not the same in Czech. There are verbs - "hajat, hajínkat", which are childish terms corresponding to the verb "spát" - to sleep, in normal Czech.

    "to go to sleep" is "jít spát" or "jít si lehnout" in normal Czech. In childish speech it's "jít si hajnout, jít hajínkat, jít hajat" or "jít do hajan".

    "to sleep" is "spát" in normal Czech. In childish speech it's "hajat, hajínkat" or "dělat hají".

    Thus - in die Heia gehen - jít do hajan, Heia machen - dělat hají

    "spát" is more often "spinkat" in childish speech

    "jít spát" is more often "jít spinkat" in childish speech
     
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    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    IN Dutch: dodo doen, in children's language...
    In French, as in Dutch (or is it the other way round ;))
    "faire dodo", "(aller au) dodo", "dodo"
    Ex:
    "Allez les enfants, au dodo maintenant !"

    In normal speech, it would be: "aller dormir" (literally "go sleep"), "aller se coucher" (literally: "go lie down")
     
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    In Greek:
    «Νάνι» ('nani neuter noun) or «νανάκια» (na'naca neuter noun) diminutive of «νάνι». From the lullaby which in Greek is «νανούρισμα» (na'nurizma neuter noun). E.g.
    «Πάμε γιά νάνι/νανάκια» ('pame ʝa 'nani/na'naca) lit. "let's go for nani"

    [c] is a voiceless palatal plosive
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Russian:
    идти баиньки (to go bain'ki) or идти бай-бай (bai-bai) < баюкать (rock to sleep) < баить (to tell [tales before sleep]).
    Баить is the cognate of Latin fari - to speak, fabula - speech, story.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    In children's language:
    — verbs нани (nani) ['nani], нанa (nana) ['nana], нанка (nanka) ['naŋka];
    — nouns нанење (nanenje) ['nanɛɲɛ], нанaње (nananje) ['nanaɲɛ], нанкање (nankanje) ['naŋkaɲɛ];
    — or the expression нану-нану (nanu-nanu) "to sleep", "to go to sleep", "sleep", "sleeping", "I'm sleepy" etc.

    Example: Нани ми, нанкај, бебенце! (Nani mi, nankaj, bebence!)
     
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    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Catalan:

    fer nones (from Latin hora nona "ninth hour", the prayers of the early afternoon, and hence related to English noon). Despite the religious origin, now restricted to childish speech due to the alliteration.
    momir (a simpler way to say dormir which is the normal word for "to sleep"). This also exists in Spanish.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    "Fare la nanna" in Italian. "Andare a fare la nanna" is "to go to sleep" in children's language. "Ninna-nanna" is "lullaby" in Italian.
     
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