held the oral argument

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Zgutierr

New Member
Spanglish
"I wanted to let you know that today the court held the oral argument in your appeal."

The phrase above is from an appellate attorney to his client. I had translated oral argument as follows in the past:

En estos momentos, estoy esperando que el tribunal fije la fecha para el argumento oral.

Maybe this is a technical term with a technical translation in Spanish. Can somebody help me on this please? Gracias

el tribunal celebro el argumento oral de su apelacion. (my try)
 
  • aguanapeich

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    My try:

    Quería hacerle saber que hoy el tribunal celebró la vista oral en su apelación.

    In Spain a hearing held in an appeal process is commonly called vista. The "oral" is implied, but it is not incorrect to include it.

    KR,

    AG.
     

    Zgutierr

    New Member
    Spanglish
    Gracias aguanapeich. It sounds very good desde la madre patria. However, most Spanish speaking prisoners in California are from Mexico. Does anybody from Mexico can help? Veamos quien se anima. :)
     

    David

    Banned
    "Spanglish" raises a very interesting point, but alas it applies to "Spanglish." The problem is not whether "vista oral" is the proper translation for "oral argument,"--it is!--but whether the client will understand what that means. That depends on the context of the letter being sent. If the lawyer has written a letter appropriate for the client's experience and comprehension of the matters at hand, and the tanslator has adequate training and vocabulary, it will be an easy matter to translate it into proper Spanish. Unfortunately, in the United States. 2/3 of the letters written to Spanish-speaking immigrants dissolve into either baby talk or gibberish because the "translators" raised in an environment which is not "bilingual," but "semilingual", simply lack the vocabulary to write a decent letter in Spanish. As a result the client is faced with either gibberish or baby talk. You could also say "Sirva la presente para avisarle que hoy en la apelación de su demanda --if it is a demanda-- los abogados presentaron sus alegatos finales en audiencia ante los jueces--but this would probably be a different letter from the one written and supposedly being translated. This is a tremendous problem in the US, where literally millions of Hispanic immigrants are obliged to rely on what passes for "legal information" inflicted on them by US-born and English-educated "translators" qualified more by ethnicity than knowledge of the law and the Spanish language, with the implicit complicity of lawyers who have no idea what the clients know or do not know because they were interviewed through inadequate interpreters. Legal translation is not a hobby.


    P.S. A legal "argument" is an alegato, not an "argumento," even in Caléxico.
     

    Zgutierr

    New Member
    Spanglish
    David, thank you for you input. Although you might be right, I believe it makes more sense for the Spanish speaking clients to read the information in their mother tongue than in English. It is true that it may not be a perfect translation, but I am trying to communicate the essence of the message not instructing them in the law process. If the client wants clarification about what this legal proceeding means he can ask and (John) the attorney will clarify it for him. I used Agunapeich contribution since no one else offered help. I used argumento as in debate. Alegato I think it is used for (closing statements) (alegatos de clausura). El idioma no ese blanco y negro sino de muchos matices.
     
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