He'll <be out for> at least two weeks.

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Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi teachers,
Script from a conversation at a restaurant.
Waiter: Oh, I'm so sorry, but we aren't serving pies today.
Man: Huh? I thought this was Heavenly Pies Restaurant.
Waiter: Well, it usually is, but, Dave, our baker, slipped in the kitchen on a banana two days ago, and hurt his leg. He'll be out for at least two weeks.

My question:
What does "be out for" mean?
Does it mean that the baker won't work for at least two weeks? Do you always use "be out for" when someone who works has an illness or has hurt or been hurt at working hours?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I often see "He'll be out for two weeks" and similar in reports on professional sport ("out of action" is implied), but it does sound odd in an employment context. In your scenario, I too would use "off".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree with Dale. It would be totally normal in a U.S. context to say "He'll be out for two weeks", meaning he won't be coming to work for two weeks because of an accident like that. If he was just on a scheduled vacation, I would say "He's off for the next two weeks" or "He has a couple of weeks off."
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In AE, "to be out for xtime" is the standard expression to indicate "absent from the workplace."
    I agree with Dale. It would be totally normal in a U.S. context to say "He'll be out for two weeks", meaning he won't be coming to work for two weeks because of an accident like that. If he was just on a scheduled vacation, I would say "He's off for the next two weeks" or "He has a couple of weeks off."
    Thank you for you opinions. Now I have the British and American version of the same meaning. :):)

    TL
     
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