Hello

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jet

New Member
united state, english
i was wondering if anybody knew how to say hello in these languages:

japanese
korean
cantonese
mandarin
thai
tagalog
samoan
ilocano
chamorro
tahitan
tongan
malay

help would be appreciated or you could give me a website where i could find it easily. i need to do this for one of my work at college
 
  • Isis

    Member
    Philippines Filipino,English,Spanish,Chinese and Bahasa Melayu
    hi jet! this is Isis from the Philippines and am here to help you with the translation

    japanese
    korean - anyeong ( an-yong)
    cantonese
    mandarin - ni hao (ni-haw)
    thai - sawadee (sa-wa-di)
    tagalog - kamusta (ka-moos-tah)
    samoan - maalelouay (ma-al-le-lu-ay)
    ilocano - naimbag nga isasangbay (na-im-bahg-nga-ee-sah-sahng-bhay)
    chamorro
    tahitan
    tongan
    malay - apa khabar (ap-pa-kah-barrh)

    :)
     

    naery

    New Member
    USA-English
    Japanese:

    general: Konnichiwa
    morning: Ohayo Gozaimass
    evening: Konbanwa
    also, the good night farewell: Oyasumi Nasai
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    ayed said:
    In Arabic, we are used to saying:"Ahlan" or "Hala".
    أهلاً أو هلا
    Hi ayed, how d'ye do?

    Does the word أهلاً refer to the 'family' or something like this? And doesn't the word هلا mean 'if not' or 'isn't...?' ?

    Please add some other ways. I also know آلو but I think it refers to calling, doesn't it?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    Hi ayed, how d'ye do?

    Does the word أهلاً refer to the 'family' or something like this? And doesn't the word هلا mean 'if not' or 'isn't...?' ?

    Please add some other ways. I also know آلو but I think it refers to calling, doesn't it?
    Yes,أهلاً does refer to family. The original sense of the expression was that of welcoming somebody as a member of the family. هلا is a shortened form. آلو is used strictly for telephone conversations, at least in Palestinian Arabic.

    Another alternative is ﺍﺒﺤﺮﻤ [marhaba]. That's actually the most common greeting in Palestinian Arabic. I hope this helps.

    (Übrigens: Dein Arabisch ist klasse! ;) )
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    elroy said:
    Yes,أهلاً does refer to family. The original sense of the expression was that of welcoming somebody as a member of the family. هلا is a shortened form. آلو is used strictly for telephone conversations, at least in Palestinian Arabic.

    Another alternative is ﺍﺒﺤﺮﻤ [marhaba]. That's actually the most common greeting in Palestinian Arabic. I hope this helps.

    (Übrigens: Dein Arabisch ist klasse! ;) )
    Thank you very much. Now I know the origin much better than before. Thanks for the compliment. I'm still studying it.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    Thank you very much. Now I know the origin much better than before. Thanks for the compliment. I'm still studying it.
    I just realized I failed to answer your question about هلا .

    The correct form for "isn't" is اﻻ. "if not" is ﺍﻦ ﻻ.

    In short, the opposite of هل is not هلا . By the way, هل can be substituted by ا.

    Viel Erfolg noch! Du lernst doch schnell! :D
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    elroy said:
    I just realized I failed to answer your question about هلا .

    The correct form for "isn't" is اﻻ. "if not" is ﺍﻦ ﻻ.

    In short, the opposite of هل is not هلا . By the way, هل can be substituted by ا.

    Viel Erfolg noch! Du lernst doch schnell! :D
    Well, I didn't mean "if not" in the sense of "wenn nicht (in German)", but rather like ""ob nicht". Since your German is unbeatable and you seem to be very fly, I had to compare it with German. :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    Well, I didn't mean "if not" in the sense of "wenn nicht (in German)", but rather like ""ob nicht". Since your German is unbeatable and you seem to be very fly, I had to compare it with German. :)
    Ah...I see now. It's just that you wouldn't say "if not" in English. Actually, "ob nicht" isn't an exact translation either, since the structure is not directly translatable, but "ob nicht" is closer to the meaning. Either way, I can tell you understand the structure pretty well. Just remember that it can be used ONLY with questions and that it is NOT هلا but اﻻ.

    Unbeatable - why that's quite the compliment! :D Many thanks! ;)

    "You seem to be very fly" - ich verstehe genau nicht, was du hiermit sagen möchtest. Eine Erklärung würde gerne abgeschätzt. :)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    elroy said:
    "You seem to be very fly" - ich verstehe nicht genau, was du hiermit sagen möchtest. Eine Erklärung würde ich sehr schätzen. :)
    I just saw you answered here. :eek:

    "fly" is something like clever, I thought. So "you seem to be very fly" was supposed to mean "you seem to be very clever". :D
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    I just saw you answered here. :eek:

    "fly" is something like clever, I thought. So "you seem to be very fly" was supposed to mean "you seem to be very clever". :D
    I can't say I've heard that expression. It could be British, or just simply unknown to me.
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    elroy said:
    I can't say I've heard that expression. It could be British, or just simply unknown to me.
    Nope not British, but hip enough to be unknown to you. Being fly generally is slang for either fine, sexy or cool, in style.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    JLanguage said:
    Nope not British, but hip enough to be unknown to you. Being fly generally is slang for either fine, sexy or cool, in style.
    Haha, that sounds kinda mean. :p

    Okay, seriously, have you ever used or heard the word "fly" as an adjective? And what about the adverb then? Could that be "flily" then? :D :D :D
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    Whodunit said:
    Haha, that sounds kinda mean. :p

    Okay, seriously, have you ever used or heard the word "fly" as an adjective? And what about the adverb then? Could that be "flily" then? :D :D :D
    There's no adverb, it's always used as an adjective as far as I know. I've never actually heard anyone say it, but I've heard it in a song, "pretty fly for a white guy".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    JLanguage said:
    Nope not British, but hip enough to be unknown to you. Being fly generally is slang for either fine, sexy or cool, in style.
    Are you saying I'm not hip?! :cool:
     

    MingRaymond

    Senior Member
    HK Cantonese
    Hello is 'nei ho' in Cantonese. But it is not commonly used. When two Cantonese-speaking people meet, we often say 'Hello' or ' Hi' in English. 'nei ho' is not very common. Of course, you can also say this.

    Just like ' ng on'(good afternoon)and ' man on'(good evening) , Cantonese- speaking people seldom use them.
     

    Andræs

    Member
    Español (AR)
    JLanguage said:
    Nope not British, but hip enough to be unknown to you. Being fly generally is slang for either fine, sexy or cool, in style.
    There is a song from Offspring, I don´t remember it´s name but it says "and all the girls say I´m pretty fly (for a white guy)". So I understood it means something like cool.
     

    fob-soldier

    New Member
    Samoan, English, New Zealand, Australia
    Isis said:
    hi jet! this is Isis from the Philippines and am here to help you with the translation

    japanese
    korean - anyeong ( an-yong)
    cantonese
    mandarin - ni hao (ni-haw)
    thai - sawadee (sa-wa-di)
    tagalog - kamusta (ka-moos-tah)
    samoan - maalelouay (ma-al-le-lu-ay)
    ilocano - naimbag nga isasangbay (na-im-bahg-nga-ee-sah-sahng-bhay)
    chamorro
    tahitan
    tongan
    malay - apa khabar (ap-pa-kah-barrh)

    :)
    i there this is Mathew from Melbourne and there are a few mistakes on what Isis has written down so I have just corrected it. I have also added a few others that are not there.

    Japanese - Kanichua
    Samoan - Talofa
    Tahitian - Iorana
    Tongan - Maloelelei

    I hope that clears things up and helps you out! Cheers
     
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