Help oneself to enter

Prower

Banned
Russian
I would like to know when this phrase can be used.


He helped himself to the room.

Is it always about entering something or not only that?

And what would be the difference here?

He helped himself to the room. VERSUS He entered the room.
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Prower - there is a lack of context here and so we can't be sure what is meant. One possibility is the usage as in the thread DerPilz links to.
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    Do you have enough of contexr now?

    Today my landlord helped himself into my apartment, into my room, and heard my dog that I have yet to register in the leasing office. I recieved a letter later this evening notifying me that I have 7 days to take care of the problem, with the option either leaving(while finishing my term), getting evicted(also still forced to pay my term worth), and pay a $300 fine. Now aren't they supposed to give me at least some kind of warning before they barge in here and fine me for things? What can I do to get out of this, because I simply can't afford to pay $300 plus rent.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Yes, but this is a different usage "helped himself into" not "helped himself to" that you mention in the first post. The usage you quote doesn't sound idiomatic to me - but I would think he means that the landlord "let himself into my apartment" which is opened the door himself without asking permission.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Let's say a different preposition, not usage. Does it always imply without permission?
    It is a different usage. "To help oneself to something" is idiomatic "to help oneself into something" isn't and the two phases do not mean the same thing.

    Yes, the "help oneself" part implies without permission, although it doesn't necessarily imply that permission was needed. As I say, "he helped himself into the apartment" is an odd thing to say, at least in my variety of English.
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    Do you mean that each option has its own meaning?

    1) To help oneself to something

    2) to help oneself into something

    What does each of them mean?

    PS Well, at least the first one.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Do you mean that each option has its own meaning?

    1) To help oneself to something

    2) to help oneself into something

    What does each of them mean?

    PS Well, at least the first one.
    You are back to lack of context. For a possible context and meaning of 1) see the link given above by DerPilz. For 2) this isn't, for me, a usual phrase - although perhaps there is a context that hasn't occurred to me where it would work. I could make a guess at what it means depending on the context, as I do above where I assume "let himself in" is meant.
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    1) A bank employee helped himself to £12450 from the savings account of a retired couple.

    2) Jesus helped Himself into this high state of being by His use of the spoken word.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    1) A bank employee helped himself to £12450 from the savings account of a retired couple.

    2) Jesus helped Himself into this high state of being by His use of the spoken word.
    1) Took without permission.
    2) Very odd - this isn't normal English for me. The context suggests that this is a quite literal phrase so he got into "this high state" through his own help. Perhaps this is an idiomatic phrase in another variety of English, but for me on reading that I would wonder if it were written by a native speaker.

    For the "help himself into a room" context that you give above - this is more believable for me as written by a native speaker - but still doesn't sound like an idiomatic phrase, it sounds a bit like the speaker has got confused with the usage in 1) above and really means "let himself in without permission". Again, unless this is an accepted phrase in another variety of English I would avoid it.
     
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