Help yourself.

Poland91pl

Senior Member
Polish
Do people say like that? <-----Question from original thread title added to post by moderator (Florentia52)----->

I was reading a text a dialogue. A woman made cookies for the man and he said "do I smell cookies ?"
And she replied "help yourself "
 
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  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Which part don't you understand, tittiugo: is it the "help youself"?

    If so, see: Help - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    10. (transitive) followed by to: to serve (someone with food, etc) (usually in the phrase help oneself): may I help you to some more vegetables? Help yourself to peas.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Perhaps I should have said it would be universally understood by native English-speakers. :D

    A man walks into a kitchen and smells newly baked cookies. He says: “Do I smell cookies?” (as a way of implying, idiomatically, that he’d like to have one to eat).

    The woman who cooked them says to him: “Help yourself!” (as an invitation for him to take and eat a cookie).


    cross-posted
     

    tittiugo

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    It'd be like sayING ((it's better perhaps): "take some cookies by yourself"? :confused:

    Thank you a lot Lingo & Loob.


    I've got it now! :)
     
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    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It'd be like say "take some cookies by yourself"? :confused:
    Not exactly. In a restaurant you’re normally served by a waiter or waitress. But some are self-service restaurants, where you take a plate and “serve yourself” (which is the same as “help yourself to food”).


    belatedly cross-posted
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t think it’s technically a phrasal verb, but “to help oneself” is most certainly a set expression.
     
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