her clientele elderly

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narumaru

Senior Member
China
MIEKO TERADA moved to Tama in 1976, at about the same time as everyone else there. Back then, the fast-growing city in Tokyo’s suburban fringe was busy with young married couples and children. These days, however, the strip of shops where Ms Terada runs a café is deathly quiet, her clientele elderly.
(Source: http://www.economist.com/news/asia/...ng-desperate-desperately-seeking-young-people )

Hi all. I guess "her clientele elderly" means "and her clientele is (now) elderly citizens." Am I right?
If so, what is construction of this phrase "her clientele elderly"?

Could you please help me understand this "her clientele elderly" grammatically?
There is no conjunction before this phrase and "elderly" is an adjective. I thought it sounds odd if an adjective is not followed by a noun.
I am so confused.:confused:

Thanks for your help.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Two stylistic variations: the repeated 'is' is omitted, and so is 'and': in less literary style, the strip of shops is deathly quiet, and her clientele is elderly.
     

    narumaru

    Senior Member
    China
    Thanks entangledbank. I thought this is so complicated. But thanks to your explanation, now I don't feel this complicated anymore.:)
     
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