her impeachment

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

This is a news from The Economist. I was wondering what the underlined part means.

“WHEN a president has single-figure approval ratings, faces calls for her impeachment, and has lost control of her political base, is she in a position to play hardball with the country’s legislators? Brazilians will soon find out.”
 
  • bennymix

    Senior Member
    The author is saying, by asking that question, that the president a) has low approval rating with the public, b) is facing possible impeachment (some legislators have said they want it [=call for it],
    c) has lost touch with her base-- for all these reasons, she is likely NOT in a good position to
    confront legislators, to try to pressure or threaten or punish them. But Brazil will find out soon.

    “WHEN a president has single-figure approval ratings, faces calls for her impeachment, and has lost control of her political base, is she in a position to play hardball with the country’s legislators? Brazilians will soon find out.”
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    "her impeachment" is admirably clear. Just as, in a trial of a woman, we say,
    "Her conviction was certain."

    "Her" has different meanings, e.g., "her dog," "her fault," "her traffic tickets," "her trial," [is she defendant or judge?]
     
    Last edited:

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "her impeachment" is admirably clear. Just as, in a trial of a woman, we say,
    "Her conviction was certain."

    "Her" has different meanings, e.g., "her dog" "her fault" "her traffic tickets, "her trial" [is she defendant or judge?]
    Got it. Do you mean her has different meaning but in the case "her impeachment", it could be interpreted in only one way?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I was wondering whether "the impeachment of her" would be more idiomatic since "her impeachment" seems ambiguous.
    No, and it's not ambiguous. She is the person who could be impeached, so it is "her impeachment". Just the same as "Joe went to prison following his conviction."

    Perhaps you are thinking that "her impeachment" could mean that she was impeaching somebody else - it can't. It is her impeachment by the legislature. If you want to phrase it differently you could say "the legislature's impeachment of the president", but it would be very odd to have "the legislature's impeachment" on its own. If we heard that we'd think "how can a legislature be impeached?" The meaning of the word affects the ways in which it can be used.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, and it's not ambiguous. She is the person who could be impeached, so it is "her impeachment". Just the same as "Joe went to prison following his conviction."

    Perhaps you are thinking that "her impeachment" could mean that she was impeaching somebody else - it can't. It is her impeachment by the legislature. If you want to phrase it differently you could say "the legislature's impeachment of the president", but it would be very odd to have "the legislature's impeachment" on its own. If we heard that we'd think "how can a legislature be impeached?" The meaning of the word affects the ways in which it can be used.
    Got it. One's impeachment and conviction might be taken as set phrases.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top