her mound of Venus, on the soft brown maiden-hair

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 312, chapter 14) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Connie asked Mellors if he really loved her. Then he got impatient and said "yes". Then is the following words)
And softly, he laid his hand over her mound of Venus, on the soft brown maiden-hair, and himself-sat still and naked on the bed, his face motionless in physical abstraction, almost like the face of Buddha. Motionless, and in the invisible flame of another consciousness, he sat with his hand on her, and waited for the turn.

The first sentence is a little hard for me to understand its meaning, because of the bold parts. But I feel mound of Venus(literal meaning: a hill where Venus lives) refers to Connie's vagina, maiden-hair(literal meaning:a plant growing on the mound/hill, I think) refers to the hair around her vagina, and motionless in physical abstraction refers to still absent-mindedly. But for the face of Buddha, I can't understand the facial expression, because in Chinese culture, Buddha never makes love.

Could you please explain the meaning of this sentence?
Thank you in advance
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    It has nothing to do with Buddha making love; Mellors' facial expression resembled the tranquil look on the face of statues and pictures of Buddha.

    (You're only allowed one question, as you know, but because I'm in a good mood today: "mound of Venus" is the English translation of a Latin medical term.)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The vagina is one internal part of a woman's genitalia. The mound of Venus is an exterior area of the body. It forms the triangle well below her stomach that you would see if a woman was standing in front of you with her legs together - typically it is covered with the hair referred to.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    This 'mound of Venus' is more usually referred to as the pubis or pubic area, and this "maiden- hair" is usually called pubic hair or 'pubes'.

    If the term 'maiden-hair' is/was a usual term for pubic hair, I have never come across it.
    The vaginal opening, in the vulva, does not have hair 'around it'.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Maiden-hair" has been used in literature before DHL wrote this, but with the meaning "hair of a maiden" (the hair on her head). It seems that DHL invented this whimsical use of maiden-hair for "pubic hair".

    "Maidenhair' is a fine fern, and the name obviously means "the hair of a maiden", so it's not outlandish to use it in the way Lawrence did. (Not that Connie was a "maiden" of course.)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Maiden-hair is indeed the name of a plant, but Lady Chatterley's Lover is an erotic novel — not a gardening manual.
    :thumbsup::)

    I always thought that the name originated with the hair that becomes visible/grows during puberty in the transition from child to maiden. And thought it preceded DHL by a long way. But that is mainly an assumption on my part...
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Mound of Venus" is the English version of "mons veneris", a latin term for a body part on women. It is a small raised area on the lower torso, well below the navel but above the genitals. It may be raised a little or a lot. It is noticeable in some bikini model photos (though covered by the bikini).
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    < Discussion added to previous thread. Cagey, moderator >

    Hi,
    Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 329, the last paragraph, chapter 15) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):

    With quiet fingers he threaded(=plugged or planted, levelly) a few forget-me-not flowers in the fine brown fleece of the mound of Venus.
    ‘There(=oh)!’ he said. ‘There’s forget-me-nots in the right place!’
    She looked down at the milky odd little flowers among the brown maiden-hair at the lower tip of her body.

    I feel the blue part a little confusing. However, I understand tip to be end, rather than something sharp or pointed. In other words, lower tip of her body refers to her lower body
    And I think maiden-hair, which is a name of a plant, here is compared to pubic hair.
    Is that right please? Could you please tell me the meaning of the blue part?
    Thank you in advance
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, it takes a moment to see how 'body' is used here: it must mean "trunk, torso", that is, not her arms and legs or head. In that narrower meaning, the pubic hair indeed forms a pointed tip at its lowest part.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you. That makes sense in logic. But is maiden-hair a name of a plant, which is compared to the pubic hair here?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We have discussed this already. Yes he's calling her pubic hair 'maiden-hair' after the fern of that name. She is not of course a maiden, which means virgin. 'Thread' means 'weave'.
    Do you keep a card index of words and terms? It's an essential tool for this sort of work.

     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Sorry. But I indeed marked all the language points,and I will learn them by heart after I finished the novel. It's a pity that I overlooked this one. Thank you very very much
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I wondered if this was a more general use of maiden-hair, but the OED only gives examples from Lawrence for it, and ones in the 1600s where it just means a maiden's hair.
     
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