here he comes again

cfu507

Senior Member
Hebrew
"Watch out! Here he comes again!"

Why did he said "comes" while it happened at the same time the person was saying this sentence? Why not "...He is coming again"

Also, when someone starts to talk about something that you don't want to here about anymore, you say "here it comes!" (scornfully). Why is it "comes" and not
“here it is coming again"


Thank you
 
  • dannyv

    Senior Member
    Not quite the same time. "Watch out! Here he comes [he is about to come] again. Look at it this way: Prepare yourself now [present] for what is to come [future] or for "what comes"... in this last, you see "comes" is also conveying a future event in the sense of "what is to come"...

    Same thing with "Here it comes!" when referring to what is about to come out of someone's speech...
     

    floise

    Senior Member
    U.S.;English
    Hi cfu507,

    The present progressive (am ....ing/are ....ing) is not used for actions that are habitual. In the sentence you give, the word 'again' indicates that this is an action that re-occurs again and again.

    You can say: 'He is coming down the street right now'. (present progressive to describe an action that is occurring right now)

    But if he comes down the street every hour, you'd say: 'Here he comes again'. (simple present to describe a re-occurring activity)

    Floise
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    Not quite the same time. "Watch out! Here he comes [he is about to come] again. Look at it this way: Prepare yourself now [present] for what is to come [future] or for "what comes"... in this last, you see "comes" is also conveying a future event in the sense of "what is to come"...

    Same thing with "Here it comes!" when referring to what is about to come out of someone's speech...
    True, but "is coming" could also refer to the near future: "The train is coming." = "Here comes the train."

    Also, "Here it comes" doesn't imply that it's habitual at all, so I'd respectfully disagree with floise.

    I'm afraid I can't give you an explanation as to why we use "Here he comes," but we also use "There he goes" in the same situation. Perhaps it's just an idiom...
     
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