here, I'd like to know the difference when there's 'like' and when there's no 'like'.

jihoon

Senior Member
korean
Here's a context.

The way your described matthew sounded you were falling in love with him or something.. no offense.

here, I'd like to know the difference when there's 'like' and when there's no 'like'.

It sounds you are falling in love with him.

It implies that the speaker is supposing that I'm falling in love with him.

It sounds like you are falling in love with him.
It implies that the speaker knows I'm not falling in love with him.

I just wanna know the difference in nuance between them.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Here's a context.

    The way your described matthew sounded you were falling in love with him or something.. no offense.:cross:

    here, I'd like to know the difference when there's 'like' and when there's no 'like'.

    It sounds you are falling in love with him. :cross:

    It implies that the speaker is supposing that I'm falling in love with him.

    It sounds like you are falling in love with him. :tick:
    It implies that the speaker knows I'm not falling in love with him. :cross:

    I just wanna :cross: know the difference in nuance between them.
    The difference is you cannot use "sounds" without "like" in this context.
    Your deducation that the speaker "knows I am not falling in love with him" is mistaken. This sentence (It sounds like you are falling in love with him) suggests that the speaker thinks you are very keen on Matthew.

    Having put in a few red crosses I realised that there are a few other minor errors in your sentences. "youR" does not need the R and Matthew needs a capital letter.
    We do not use shorthand like wanna in here either ;)
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It sounds you are falling in love with him.
    It implies that the speaker is supposing that I'm falling in love with him.

    It sounds like you are falling in love with him.
    It implies that the speaker knows I'm not falling in love with him.
    The first one doesn't work. :(

    The speaker doesn't know whether you're falling in love or not, but gets the impression that you possibly are from the phrase "it sounds like...".

    So you need "It sounds like you are falling in love with him."
    As, perhaps, a more elegant way of saying it, you could also have: "It sounds as if you are falling in love with him."
     
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