Here is X and there is X./There is X here & there is X there

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
I wonder what is the proper way of saying that a thing exists near me, here and a thing exists farther away from me, there.
For example, there are two chairs on the opposite sides of a table, in a room. One is closer to me than the other. I think that I can say:
1. There is a chair here and there is a chair there.
What about:
2. Here is a chair and there is a chair. :confused:
I don't think I could say: 3. Here, there is a chair and there, there is a chair.
 
  • Fictional

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    I don't know whether what I'm going to write is the best way of saying it, still here's my version:

    There's one chair here and another one there.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm trying to say that here, where I'm standing, a chair exists. And there, on the other side of the table, a chair exists. I would like to know if the existence of a thing has to be expressed by the construction "there is" or I can do without it and use simply "is" in this context.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's possible to say 1. and 2.

    For 3. I might (with the right context) say "Here there's a chair and over there, there's another chair."
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Here is a chair can be heard to mean You need a place to sit. I’m offering this chair for you to sit in. There is a chair can be heard as the beginning of a longer sentence, such as There is a chair I’ve been looking to buy. I think Here is a chair and there is a chair is awkward, because these alternate possibilities occur in the back of a listener’s mind, and he has to work to come to the meaning you intend.
     
    Last edited:

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Here is a chair can be heard to mean You need a place to sit. I’m offering this chair for you to sit in. There is a chair can be heard as the beginning of a longer sentence, such as There is a chair I’ve been looking to buy. I think Here is a chair and there is a chair is awkward, because these alternate possibilities occur in the back of a listener’s mind, and he has to work to come to the meaning you intend.
    Thank you, srk. A "Here is X" sentence, where X=chair, can indeed cause confusion. But my intention isn't to offer a place to sit. I just want to remark on reality around me. In particular, I want to remark that a thing exists next to me and a thing exists farther away from me. A reality around me could consist of different things in a living room, in an area where I live (Here is an old house and there is a new one. Here is a church and there is a bus stop. Here is Nelson's Column and there is the British Museum). I think that a similar description of reality is presented by Robert Louis Stevenson in his poem "From a Railway Carriage":
    Here is a cart run away in the road
    Lumping along with man and load;
    And here is a mill and there is a river:
    Each a glimpse and gone for ever!



    I've just started to wonder if I could achieve the same effect if I said:
    This is a chair and that is a chair.
    This is Nelson's Column and that is the British Museum. :confused:
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It's possible to say 1. and 2.

    For 3. I might (with the right context) say "Here there's a chair and over there, there's another chair."
    Could it be that in sentence 1. I stress the word chair and in sentences 2. and 3. I stress its location?
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    wolfbm1 said:
    I just want to remark on reality around me. In particular, I want to remark that a thing exists next to me and a thing exists farther away from me.
    That’s what I understood you wanted.

    This is a chair and that is a chair works, as does This is Nelson’s Column and that is the British Museum, if you can somehow see both at once. Neither sentence invites confusion. Here is Nelson’s Column and there is the British Museum is also straightforward.

    Here is a chair designed by Charles Eames, and there is a chair by Frank Lloyd Wright is a little better than just “chairs”. Bare-bones chairs or apples help make the meaning of “here” uncertain.

    Over here” and “over there” also force the interpretation you want, even with bare-bones chairs.
     
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