Here you are and here we go

light the moon

New Member
arabic
hi everybody
I always heard those sentences but I cant understand what is meaning of these?
1- here you are
2- here we go
like that sentences...maybe it's a stupid question but really I cant understand...
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It would help us if you could tell us under what circumstances you hear these. And capital letters and punctuation would impress us. :)
     

    soccergal

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I agree with Copyright that the context would help. In general, someone might say "here you are" if he were giving you something. So if you asked for a cookie and I gave you one, I would say "here you are" (or "here you go") as I was handing it to you. Also, if I lead you somewhere (a specific department in a store, perhaps) I might say, "here you are" when we arrive.
    I might say "here we go" if we were literally starting to go somewhere. It also might be used sarcastically in a situation where someone starts talking about a topic or acting in a way that others expect, but hope won't happen.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello light the moon - welcome to WordReference :)
    You will find lots of examples of these expressions if you look at these previous threads.
    I found them by using the forum's dictionary and thread title search for here you are and here we go :)



    "Here you are" or "Here you go"
    here you are
    here you are
    here you are!
    Here you are! / Here you have!
    Here you are.
    here you are/here I am
    Here you are/here you go
    Here you go/here you are

    Here We Go
    here we go again
    here we go!
    Here we go.
    ☛☛Forum Rule #1
    Look for the answer first.
    Check the WordReference dictionaries if available (and scroll down for a list of related threads) or use the forum's search function.
     

    teatom

    Senior Member
    German, fluent in English and Spanish
    Well intuitively I would suggest, that the sentences means: we don't want to have anything to do with you. Mind your own business and leave us in peace.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well intuitively I would suggest, that the sentences means: we don't want to have anything to do with you. Mind your own business and leave us in peace.
    Certainly not. I won't expand, there's already enough threads on the topic.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top