Here you are / Here you go / There you are / There you go

Forero

Senior Member
In the restaurant situation, I would expect "Here you go" rather than "there you go", but it does depend on what exactly is meant, which is up to the speaker.

"Here you go" would be said when the items in question are held by the server, possibly so that people will be aware of the filled glasses of liquid or hot plates, etc., and help clear a suitable place for them on the table.

In contrast, "There you go" has an air of finality. Either everything is already on the table or something (a question, a disagreement, a feeling that something was missing) has been settled. It seems more appropriate to me to let the people who ordered make such determinations for themselves, to express approval or disapproval, and even to order more.
 
  • zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I watched a video on YT and a Canadian said he uses "here we go" when handing things and 'there we go' as an encouragement. Yet he gave no example. Would you agree with him? Can you give me an example?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I watched a video on YT and a Canadian said he uses "here we go" when handing things and 'there we go' as an encouragement. Yet he gave no example. Would you agree with him? Can you give me an example?
    He seems to use "we" to make the comments more inclusive than the (t)here you go, as in a joint activity, for example.
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    [This question has been added to a previous existing discussion on roughly the same topic. Please read down from the top. DonnyB - moderator]
    Greetings!

    As written in cambridge.org, we can use “here” instead of “here you are/go” when giving something to someone:
    (1) Here, try some of this - it's delicious!

    Examples with "here you are/go":
    cambridge.org:
    (2) "Could you pass the sugar, please?" "Here you are."
    oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com:
    (3) Here you are. This is what you were asking for.

    As I understand, I can also say (2) & (3) without "you are/go":
    (2a) "Could you pass the sugar, please?" "Here."
    (3a) Here. This is what you were asking for.
    Are (2a) & (3a) correct and if not, then why?

    If I can say “here” instead of “here you are/go”, can I say “there” instead of “there you are/go”:
    (1b) There, try some of this - it's delicious!
    (2b) "Could you pass the sugar, please?" "There."
    (3b) There. This is what you were asking for.
    Are (1b), (2b) & (3b) correct?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    No, "There" doesn't work like that. And just saying "Here" sounds a bit impolite to me. You might say that with a family member when you're distracted by something else and you can be abrupt like that without major consequences but it wouldn't be fit for a more general social situation in my opinion.
     
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