hereditary burden/encumbrance or what? [medicine]

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boozer

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hello, friends,

I am doing this translation - a very tough medical text that I barely understand in my language. I simply had to take it against my own free will, so to speak. :) None too fond of medicine.

Anyway, it is about someone who is said to be 'hereditarily burdened', meaning that there is a disease that was passed on to him by his mother. The disease runs in the family. But I do not remember ever reading any such thing in English, I mean saying that someone is 'hereditarily burdened/encumbered' because their parents had a disease that they passed on to them.

Any ideas how I can express it in English without sounding weird?
 
  • George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    "Hereditary burden" is a euphemism.

    GF..

    And this one doesn't really work....

    He/she has a hereditary disease .
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I think 'hereditary affliction' might work, Vik.

    George, thank you for your suggestion, but using it would mean substantially deviating from the original.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Thinks, JS. The thing is, I inadvertently rephrased Vik's hereditarily afflicted. I need to say that theerson is 'hereditarily afflicted'. Quite frankly, I have no problem with 'hereditary affliction', but 'hereditarily afflicted' sounds a bit contrived to me, like a back-formation, and this is the only reason why I still have not embraced it unconditionally :D
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Hereditarily burdened" doesn't necessarily mean that one has a hereditary disease or affliction. It could refer to a hereditary weakness of some sort, or a gene known to predispose to the possibility of disease (such as a gene for breast cancer), or the likelihood of (a man's) eventually becoming bald, or simply a characteristic such as being markedly shorter or taller than average.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Boozer, could you not use Julian's suggestion and say that the person "has a genetic disorder" or "has an inherited disorder"?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Boozer, could you not use Julian's suggestion and say that the person "has a genetic disorder" or "has an inherited disorder"?
    :thumbsup: Surely you're at least allowed to change parts of speech between Bulgarian and English, Mr B ... ?

    Wild horses couldn't get me to write hereditarily afflicted. And I reckon I'd need serious facial surgery before I could actually say it.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    :thumbsup:

    Wild horses couldn't get me to write hereditarily afflicted. And I reckon I'd need serious facial surgery before I could actually say it.
    There you go.... I love this man. :D :D :D Every time he says something like this I spend the rest of the day laughing for no obvious reason, like a retard. But, then, again, I am beginning to put up with the inevitability of being regarded as one by sizeable pockets of the local population. :D

    Thank you all, people! I am beginning to understand why I have not yet encountered the phrase I was looking for - maybe it simply does not exist. Yes, Ewie, I will have to change parts of speech lest the English-speaking doctor reading my translation should think the translator was hereditarily afflicted with some mental disorder. :)
     
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