'here's a boat' or 'there's a boat here'?

Fredziu

Senior Member
Polish
Hello everyone,

I'm sitting with a child and looking at a picture in a book, and I say: Look at the picture of this park. Can you see a boat and a duck on the pond?
The child finds what I'm asking about and wants to say what he's found. What can he say pointing at the things he's found? Which of the versions below would be the best / most natural?

A) There's a boat here. And there's a duck here.

B) There's a boat here. And here's a duck.

C) Here's a boat. And here's a duck.
 
  • Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    What age is the child? They could say anything from 'Duckie!' to 'I observe a feathered creature navigating the waters'.
     

    Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Well, you've told her that there is a duck, and a boat, so she'll probably say something like: 'There's the duck, and that's the boat over there'.
     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    What if the question was more open like Can you see any boats or birds on the pond? Would any of my suggestions work then?
     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    What if the picture is close to the child and he touches the things that he talks about? Is it OK to use 'there' and 'that' then or should it be Here's the duck, and this is the boat over here?
     

    Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    What if the picture is close to the child and he touches the things that he talks about? Is it OK to use 'there' and 'that' then or should it be Here's the duck, and this is the boat over here?
    Probably. Children are not the most predictable language users.
     
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