He's gone a lot.

amy20082008

Member
mandarin, P.R.China
A is finding B, who is on parole, but B is not in. Then A talks to B's wife.
...
A:i haven't kept in touch with him(B) but i heard that he was in some kind of trouble.
B's wife: He's gone a lot. It's not safe around here for him, you know. His parole officer really wathes him all the time and so sometimes it is just better for him not to come here. Bisides, we haven't been together for a while.I hear he's in town somewhere."

Does "He's gone a lot." mean "He's gone through a lot of troubles"?
 
  • Tatzingo

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Hi,

    I agree with Nokeefe99.

    It can only mean that he is away from home very often.

    He's gone a lot. = He goes away (from home) a lot = He's not in very often.

    Tatz.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    comsci said:
    He's gone for long.
    He's gone for a long time.

    "He's gone a lot" doesn't make too much sense to me, if at all.
    "He's gone a lot" = "He's gone a lot (of the time)" = "he comes and goes, but mostly he's not here".
    "A lot" is not the same as "a (single) long time"
     

    comsci

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    maxiogee said:
    "He's gone a lot" = "He's gone a lot (of the time)" = "he comes and goes, but mostly he's not here".
    "A lot" is not the same as "a (single) long time"

    Ok, I can take that. "He's gone a lot" means "He's not often here" or "He's often away from somewhere", not necessarily from "home."

    Point taken, Maxi.

    PS: "a lot" suggests frequency of time being away instead of length of time. :)
     
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