He's good-tempered

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

My cousin knows I go to A lottery shop very often. I recently have bought lottery in B shop. He was curious because I changed a new one, I told him that I now buy in B shops for many reasons, one of them is about the owner, I said:

He is good-tempered. (The man is offended or angry at all when I tease him, also, he's very friendly and always gives me free drinks, though I don't accept. Moreover, he nevers says bad things about other lottery shops because the competition is fierce, while other shops will say bad things to each other.)

Thanks a lot
 
  • Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Sorry, Kentix, I wonder if the bold is used correctly, the word to describe this shop owner or do I need to say something else. :)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It's not wrong, but I think good-natured would be better.
    The question arises whether the prefix should be good or well.
    With natured, I feel it needs to be good; with mannered it needs to be well; with tempered I think both work, but I'd lean more towards well, but perhaps J S Bach has something to do with it.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Well-tempered makes me think of glass being tempered (to make it stronger) correctly, so I would probably use good-tempered there.
     

    The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    'Well-tempered" is usually used to describe dogs, not people. 'good-natured' is better. I also agree with Edinburgher with respect to Bach.
     
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