He's got a lot of souvenirs and computer games about football.

Fredziu

Senior Member
Polish
Hello everyone,

One of my students wrote the following sentence: He's got a lot of souvenirs and computer games about football.
I wonder if it's correct to use about in this context, or should it be 'connected with football'?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Colloquially, in BE we’d be more likely to say “to do with” football. Or we’d use football as an attributive noun:

    He's got a lot of football souvenirs and computer games
     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    But "about" definitely sounds like the wrong word.
    Is it wrong with both 'souvenirs' and 'games'? I've seen a post by a native speaker on this forum where the word 'game' was followed by 'about' - "Is it a video game about spies or a video game about talking animals ..."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Souvenirs about football would definitely be wrong.

    I would consider computer games about football wrong, too. Books can be about things but I don't see how a game can be. Those would be football-themed games, or football-based games.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Souvenirs about football" is wrong.
    "Games about football" isn't right for a game which consists of playing football. I'd say computer football games.
     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Please forgive me if I'm being a pain, but I'm still confused. Does it mean 'a video game about spies' is OK but 'computer games about football' is wrong?
     

    jaker93139

    New Member
    American English
    I don't think it is wrong, it just makes it seem like the computer game is a trivia game where you learn about football instead of playing football. But someone could phrase it that way, especially if asked by someone who doesn't play computer games alot (they might ask what the game is about rather than what type of game is it). I would tend to think that someone who doesn't play computer / video games alot or is under the age of 12 or 13 (but is a native English speaker) would use the term played a game about football on the computer rather than played a football game on the computer. It might make even more sense to say a game about wizards or a game about spies especially to a non gamer who wouldn't understand what a fantasy role playing or first person shooter where you are a spy would mean. It is confusing but hopefully that helps.
     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thanks a lot for your explanation, jaker. It makes sense :thumbsup:. You have cleared my doubts.

    And thank you all for your help!
     
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