He's got poisoned ...

Hotmale

Senior Member
Polish
Hi everyone,

could you tell me if this sentence is correct?
He's got poisoned by something and now he's throwing up food.

Many thanks!
 
  • 1234plet

    Senior Member
    Denmark; Danish
    I would say:
    He got poisoned by something and now he's throwing up food.

    Or the word 'to vomit' could also be used. Or just 'to throw up' without the food.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hi everyone,

    could you tell me if this sentence is correct?
    He's got poisoned by something and now he's throwing up food.

    Many thanks!
    "He's got poisoned" sounds colloquial to me, but quite a believable utterance. I don't think anyone would say "throwing up food" simply "throwing up" (or "vomiting" as eqivoque suggests for a higher register).
     

    Lee Sing

    Senior Member
    English from England
    Either 'He was poisoned and now he's throwing up' or 'He has been poisoned and now he's throwing up'.

    'Throwing up food' is not something we would say.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    puking would do, but 'nauseating' usually means a person who is making someone else sick - or a thing which is causing the vomiting. —> My son's bedroom is nauseating. ;) (Actually it's not, he's remarkably tidy.) :)
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    To get poisoned sounds like someone did it on purpose. This is possible, but I wonder if you mean
    He got food poisoning and now he is vomiting.
    Less graphic but still clear:
    He picked up a stomach bug and now he is getting being sick.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    To get poisoned sounds like someone did it on purpose. This is possible, but I wonder if you mean
    He got food poisoning and now he is vomiting.
    Less graphic but still clear:
    He picked up a stomach bug and now he is getting sick.

    Hi! KellyB, in BE you would say he's being sick
     
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