he's heard something move in the trees

Anfisa

Senior Member
Russian
Could you please clear it up that what grammatical function <move> has?
He'll attack you because he's heard something move in the trees."
(Simplified of The Yearling.57)
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    After verbs of perception there are two possible structures: with the -ing form and with the base form:
    I saw him going.
    I saw him go.
    Going
    is commoner in everyday speech. Arguably, in careful English going has a more continuous, progressive or imperfective aspect than go.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The word “move” in that sentence is the bare infinitive (i.e. with “to” omitted) of the verb “to move”.
     

    Anfisa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    After verbs of perception there are two possible structures: with the -ing form and with the base form:
    I saw him going.
    I saw him go.
    Going
    is commoner in everyday speech. Arguably, in careful English going has a more continuous, progressive or imperfective aspect than go.
    Thanks a lot.
     
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