He's not qualified to be a taekwondo master

stevepham

Senior Member
vietnam
Hello guys. I 've got a problem here. It's related (or relating too, huh >) to "to be qualified".

If I was forced to say, I would say :" You are not qualified enough to be a Taekwondo master"

But can I say : " you are not qualified enough for (being) a taekwondo master ".

====> I would be grateful if someone could help me :).
 
  • brightflame

    Senior Member
    Hm, both are alright.

    However, I find (1) (to be) more versatile.

    Consider this example:

    I've heard rumors Steve is a master of Taekwondo.
    I doubt it. He is not qualified enough to be a Taekwondo master.


    I wouldn't use "for being" in the above example.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    In my opinion:

    1. You are not qualified enough to be a Taekwondo master. :tick:
    2. You are not qualified enough as a Taekwondo master. :tick:
    3. You are not qualified enough for (being) a taekwondo master. :confused:


    #3 sounds clumsy for me.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Sigh

    "... qualified enough" is a bad choice of words. "Qualified" is an absolute. A person is either qualified or not.

    Hm, both are alright.
    I suggest reviewing the definition of alright in the dictionary here.

    The style book used by virtually all American newspapers and journalism schools says "Never alright."
     

    stevepham

    Senior Member
    vietnam
    Can I say you are not qualified for a taekwondo master instead of say ing : YOu are not qualified to be a taekwondo master.


    - I 've omitted "enough" and " being". So could you please look through the new one for me plz :) ?
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    In my opinion:

    You are not qualified to be a taekwondo master. :tick:
    You are not qualified as a taekwondo master. (The speaker is criticizing him for not doing his job right.) Sorry. :eek:


    By the way, you don't have to add 'enough' but that does not mean you can't use it. :)
     
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    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I agree with SDgraham. The proposed wordings with 'enough' are awkward at best, and weird to the ear.

    Hence, "He is not qualified to be a taekwondo master.":tick:

    HOWEVER, if you wished to introduce degrees, you might say, "His qualifications are not sufficient [for him to be][to make him] a taekwondo master.":tick:
    Or, "He does not have enough experience [or skill, training, etc.] to be considered a taekwondo master.":tick:
     

    stevepham

    Senior Member
    vietnam
    Thanks guys ! Sorry because I 've been focusing on the other problems so I didn't say thanks to you guys. Thanks alot ! So let's me confirm plz

    1) be qualified enough " is acceptable but unnecessary
    2) We say He is not qualified to be a taekwondo master and it's meaningless if we say He is not qualifed for "being" a taekwondo master.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thanks guys ! Sorry because I 've been focusing on the other problems so I didn't say thanks to you guys. Thanks alot ! So let's me confirm plz

    1) be qualified enough " is acceptable but unnecessary:thumbsdown:
    2) We say He is not qualified to be a taekwondo master and it's meaningless if we say He is not qualifed for "being" a taekwondo master.:thumbsup:
    There is no such English word as "alot." A lot of people screw that one up.

    Whether "qualified enough" is "acceptable," depends upon the situation. You would lose your job if you were working for me on an editing desk.

    "Plz" is not an English word.
     

    Chimon

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Sigh

    "... qualified enough" is a bad choice of words. "Qualified" is an absolute. A person is either qualified or not.
    Can you cite a reference for 'qualified' as an absolute? I've heard it used as though having degrees in a lot of very formal, professional native speaking circles.

    Possibly relevant:

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=sufficiently+qualified,+qualified+enough&year_start=1800&year_end=2014&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1;,sufficiently qualified;,c0;.t1;,qualified enough;,c0
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Can you cite a reference for 'qualified' as an absolute? I've heard it used as though having degrees in a lot of very formal, professional native speaking circles.

    Possibly relevant:

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=sufficiently+qualified,+qualified+enough&year_start=1800&year_end=2014&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1;,sufficiently qualified;,c0;.t1;,qualified enough;,c0
    Certainly

    http://golf.about.com/od/majorchampionships/f/masters-qualifications.htm

    In the OP's context, "qualified" means "meeting certain criteria."

    It's like qualifying as a aircraft pilot, ship's captain or anything else with established criteria. Either one meets them or one does not. It's not a matter of degree.

    Also in the OP's context, "fail to meet qualifications" is a better choice of words.

    Unfortunately, I do admit, "qualifications" has various meanings depending upon location and context. In BE, it can mean "academic credentials," which those of us with many years under our belt realize might or might not indicate whether a person is "qualified" to do something.
     
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    Chimon

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Certainly

    http://golf.about.com/od/majorchampionships/f/masters-qualifications.htm

    In the OP's context, "qualified" means "meeting certain criteria."

    It's like qualifying as a aircraft pilot, ship's captain or anything else with established criteria. Either one meets them or one does not. It's not a matter of degree.
    I'm sorry, I was not specific. I meant, "Can you cite a reference that says that qualified should only be used as an absolute and not as having degrees? I have experienced it as having degrees."
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's like qualifying as a aircraft pilot, ship's captain or anything else with established criteria. Either one meets them or one does not. It's not a matter of degree.
    Here's another veteran editor who agrees with that statement.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I agree with folks. :)


    For example:

    "You are not qualified enough to be a taekwondo master but we chose you."
    (This implies that they settle for the situation being that he becomes a taekwondo master because there is not any other choice.)


    "You are not qualified to be a taekwondo master but we chose you."
    (This could imply that they have an ulterior motive, especially bad intentions.)
     
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