He's not that way inclined

dreamlike

Senior Member
Polish
Hi everyone

is a euphenism for "homosexual, gay", namely "that way inclined" in common use or I run the risk of not being understood when using it?

- He behaves strangely towards Tom...
- He's not that way inclined, if that's what you mean...
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo DL. I can't speak for young whippersnappers like you, but farts of my age and older (and somewhat younger too, probably) will certain use it tongue-in-cheekily. Having said that, I reckon the meaning is very easily deducible, so if you did use it to your young cub British pals, they'd surely know what you meant.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Yeah, but it might prove too difficult to deduce for some still... I know it doesn't take a genius to grasp it, but then again there are many daft people around. But all right, I trust your judgement :)

    What do you mean by using it tongue-in-cheekily? You mean you might use it even if someone's not that way inclined, just for the sake of it? Or the phrase in question is humorous itself?

    Thanks for your answer, ewie :)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think it's a specific euphemism for homosexuality, though it is a circumlocution which lends itself to expressing that idea in this context - I'd say it's part of the algebra of indirect speech; and we have a lot of that...if you know what I mean ;)
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It just occurred to me that it can be used in a number of different contexts, and the phase is pretty all-purpose :)
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, it can be all-purpose but I think that for people of a certain age it so often means 'homosexual' that, if you uttered it in isolation ("Bob's not that way inclined, you know"), the vast majority of those people would take it to mean just that.
    (British) English is quite rich in these 'nudge-nudge-wink-wink' (or tongue-in-cheek) euphemisms/circumlocutions: He's not like that; He's one of those; He's on the other bus; He's a friend of Dorothy's (etc. etc.) which ~ possibly ~ might seem far too arch for people of your age, DL, but which us certain-age folks still trot out on occasion for humorous effect ... or because we don't want to state things horribly directly.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    might seem far too arch for people of your age, DL, but which us certain-age folks still trot out on occasion for humorous effect
    I think they are best used sparingly, regardless of the age - otherwise one might be regarded as a walking dictionary of humorous expressions :D
     
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