He's overwhelmed/buried in work.

hboo

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

E.g.
1)To mean "He's overwhelmed by work.", is it correct to say instead, "He's overwhelmed by work."?

2)To mean "He huried himself in work." is it correct to say instead, "He's buried in work."?

Thanks.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Your first two sentences are the same. What did you mean to ask about "overwhelmed?"

    "He buried himself in work" and "He's buried in work" don't mean the same thing, any more than "He locked himself in the office" and "He's locked in the office" do. He's buried (or locked in) in either case, but in the first version, he did it to himself.
     

    hboo

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Oh, sorry! I made a mistake in my question. Please take a look at the below:

    1)To mean "He's overwhelmed by work.", is it correct to say instead, "He's overwhelmed in work."?

    2)To mean "He huried himself in work." is it correct to say instead, "He's buried in work."?
    To mean "one is busy with somethig, or spends lots of time on something" I wanted to understand, in the sentence 1), if "overwhelmed" can be followed by "in" instead of "by"; in the sentence 2), if the phrase "bury oneself in something" can be used in passive voice.

    Thanks again!
     

    yoshi_s_island

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Oh, sorry! I made a mistake in my question. Please take a look at the below:

    To mean "one is busy with somethig, or spends lots of time on something" I wanted to understand, in the sentence 1), if "overwhelmed" can be followed by "in" instead of "by"; in the sentence 2), if the phrase "bury oneself in something" can be used in passive voice.

    Thanks again!
    1) To be overwhelmed in makes no sense. To be overwhelmed by has a meaning, but it is more than simply "being busy with something" or "spending much time doing something". If you are overwhelmed, it's from something you have no choice about, nor control over, and we speak of something you can't withstand or face.

    2) Your question is grammatically contradictory. There can be no passive form of something one does to himself. To bury oneself in something and To be buried in something are expressions which have a different meaning. The first is a choice. The second is not.
     

    hboo

    Senior Member
    Chinese

    To bury oneself in something
    and To be buried in something are expressions which have a different meaning. The first is a choice. The second is not.
    Thank you. So you mean "He's buried in work" is also a correct sentence and also means busy working? (Whether he actively works or someone makes him work isn't my question. I just wonder if this sentence is correct. Of several dictionaries I checked, none of them have the passive voice example. Hence the question.) Thanks again!
     
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