He's volatile/impetuous.

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Morecoffee

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,teachers.
He's volatile/impetuous and want to make a lot of money overnight.
I'm looking for an adjective to modify this kind of person.

Does volatile/impetuous fit my sentence?
Thank you so much
 
  • Morecoffee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In this case I would choose impetuous.
    Thank you e2efour. Impetuous means impulsive.
    So he's implusive. Then he wants to make money overnight?
    This is from Merriam Webster. Volatile can mean " unable to hold the attention fixed because of an inherent lightness or fickleness of disposition"
    I feel this is the disposition that this kind of person has.
    Note that volatile is one of a group of words constantly misused by native, not to mention ignorant, English speakers (at least the AE variety) who think it means "explosive."
    Thank you sdgraham.
    But in WR dictionaries. Volatille does mean explosive. Why did you say it's misused?
    Thank you
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    But in WR dictionaries. Volatile does mean explosive. Why did you say it's misused?
    Not in any literal sense. It's used metaphorically to show a rapid change in a social situation.

    The biggest problem is when people are dealing with a literal situation.

    Tri-choloro ethane is quite volatile, for example, but nothing you can do will make it explode or burn.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    He's volatile/impetuous and want to make a lot of money overnight.
    Your example fails.

    The problem is that there is no logical connection between being volatile or being impetuous and wanting to make money overnight.

    You probably mean "impatient." or "impractical"
     
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