hiccup

  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    French:
    (le) hoquet

    German:
    der Schluckauf

    Russian:
    икота


    Tom
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thanks Trisia :)

    Well, I was hoping for something that would explain the resemblance, but well...
    Thanks for the info :)
    The Romanian dictionary says indeed that sughiţ comes from Latin subgluttiare. This explanation may look, indeed, a bit tricky, but you can make a better clue if you have a look at the Italian word, which is very similar in pronunciation: singhiozzo (something like: Ro: soogheets; It: seengheotso).

    @Trisia: In my oppinion, it may be a resemblance of an expression (archaic form, but following the Latin logic of subgluttiare): sub gâţi (under the throat). But of course, it is just a personal oppinion. However, it is a weird word indeed, considering its doubtful traces...
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    The Romanian dictionary says indeed [...] from Latin subgluttiare. This explanation may look, indeed, a bit tricky, but you can make a better clue if you have a look at the Italian word, which is very similar in pronunciation: singhiozzo
    I went to check, and that's also the origin of Portuguese soluço, via the verb soluçar.
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech:
    1. hiccup (as convulsions of diaphragma)
    noun: škytavka
    verb: škytat; noun made of verb: škytání
    onomatopoe: škyt

    2. hiccup (as inproper pronunciation doubling or multiplying whole or part of syllables)
    noun: koktání
    verb: koktat

    In Lithuanian:
    1. n. žagsėjimas
    v. žagsėti
    2.
    n. mikčiojimas
    v. mikčioti

    Thanks Trisia!
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    «Λόξυγγας» [ˈlɔ.k͜si.ŋgas] (masc.), possibly from the ancient 3rd declension masc. «λύγξ» lúnk͜s (nom. sing.), «λυγγός» lŭngós (gen. sing.) --> hiccup (PIE *sluk-/*slug- to swallow cf W. llyncu, to swallow, Pol. łkać. to sob).
    «Λύγξ > *λύγξυγγας > λόξυγγας»
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    And to Spanish singulto (which is technical and never used but exists).
    Same in Italian. Except that I wouldn't say it's never used but it's extremely rare and possibly regional (my grandma speaks more dialect than actual Italian but she basically only says singulto instead of singhiozzo; or, when speaking dialect, sanglót, which looks very French-like :D ).
     
    Last edited:

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Sardinian, where I live is :

    Taccullitta

    in other areas :

    Tuccullitta / ticcullitta / tziccullitta /singullitta

    P.S.
    In Sardinian is feminine


    I wonder if it could be onomatopoeic. Let's take for example "Taccullitta", in Sardinian language it's also the diminutive of "Taccula", a bird of the corvidae family. Coincidence, the call of this bird sounds like the human hiccup.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Same in Italian. Except that I wouldn't say it's never used but it's extremely rare and possibly regional (my grandma speaks more dialect than actual Italian but she basically only says singulto instead of singhiozzo; or, when speaking dialect, sanglót, which looks very French-like :D ).
    Interesting. Because in Catalan, singlot is hiccup but sanglot is a sob. At least in the standard, because to me they're both the same thing and I've always considered it a variation.
     
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