hiccup

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Outsider, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    What do you call this embarassing physical mishap in your language? Is it an onomatopoeia, as the English word seems to be?

    In Spanish, it's hipo, vaguely similar to English.

    In Portuguese, it's soluço, which does not seem to be an onomatopoeia.

    Many words for it in Arabic, but I can't read them.

    Thanks in advance. :)
     
  2. ukuca

    ukuca Senior Member

    Istanbul - Turkey
    Turkish - Turkey
    In Turkish they are called "yansıma sesler".
     
  3. dn88 Senior Member

    Polish
    Polish:

    czkawka
     
  4. pingvin10 New Member

    Hungary - Hungarian
    Hungarian:

    csuklás
     
  5. Lopes

    Lopes Senior Member

    Brussels
    Dutch (Amsterdam)
    In Dutch it's 'de hik'
     
  6. DrWatson

    DrWatson Senior Member

    Finnish:

    hikka


    The corresponding verb is nikotella
     
  7. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    French:
    (le) hoquet

    German:
    der Schluckauf

    Russian:
    икота


    Tom
     
  8. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Japanese:
    shakkuri
    しゃっくり
    apparently of onomatopoeic etymology
     
  9. alex.raf Member

    Iran/Persian(Farsi)
    Persian:
    Seksekeh
    سکسکه
     
  10. deine Senior Member

    Lietuva
    Lithuania - lithuanian
    Lithuanian:

    žagsėjimas
     
  11. Lello4ever

    Lello4ever Senior Member

    Napoli
    Italia - Italiano
    Italian: singhiozzo.
     
  12. Trisia

    Trisia Senior Member

    București
    Romanian
    Romanian: sughiţ
     
  13. yujuju Member

    Spanish & Basque
    Basque: zotina
     
  14. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    San Francisco
    Am. English
    Hindi, Panjabi: Hijki
     
  15. Alijsh Senior Member

    Tehran
    Persian - Iran
    Persian: sekseke
     
  16. Chazzwozzer

    Chazzwozzer Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Hiccup is hıçkırık in Turkish, which is also an onomatopoeia.
     
  17. Henryk Senior Member

    Germany, German
    In German we call it "Schluckauf" (literally: "to swallow up").
     
  18. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Hello Trisia,
    This is very interesting! In Egypt, we say zoghotta. Would you know the origin of the Romanian word?
     
  19. Trisia

    Trisia Senior Member

    București
    Romanian
    Hi, Cherine :)

    I hadn't the slightest idea, until I checked the Romanian dictionary. :D It says it comes from Latin subgluttiare.

    subgluttiare
    sub- = under, up from under; to the aid;
    glutti.are = swallow, gulp down;

    Cool Latin-English Dictionary
     
  20. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Thanks Trisia :)

    Well, I was hoping for something that would explain the resemblance, but well...
    Thanks for the info :)
     
  21. vlado1

    vlado1 Member

    Eslovaquia; eslovaco
    Slovak: štikútka, čkanie
     
  22. Trisia

    Trisia Senior Member

    București
    Romanian
    No problem.

    I am actually more inclined to think it's an onomatopoeia, you know :p
     
  23. OldAvatar Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    The Romanian dictionary says indeed that sughiţ comes from Latin subgluttiare. This explanation may look, indeed, a bit tricky, but you can make a better clue if you have a look at the Italian word, which is very similar in pronunciation: singhiozzo (something like: Ro: soogheets; It: seengheotso).

    @Trisia: In my oppinion, it may be a resemblance of an expression (archaic form, but following the Latin logic of subgluttiare): sub gâţi (under the throat). But of course, it is just a personal oppinion. However, it is a weird word indeed, considering its doubtful traces...
     
  24. Nizo Senior Member

    In Esperanto, "a hiccup" (also spelled "hiccough" in English) is singulto. The verb is singulti or hiki. The sound is hik! The word singulti comes from the Latin singultare.
     
  25. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I went to check, and that's also the origin of Portuguese soluço, via the verb soluçar.
     
  26. kusurija

    kusurija Senior Member

    Lithuania, K. city
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech:
    1. hiccup (as convulsions of diaphragma)
    noun: škytavka
    verb: škytat; noun made of verb: škytání
    onomatopoe: škyt

    2. hiccup (as inproper pronunciation doubling or multiplying whole or part of syllables)
    noun: koktání
    verb: koktat

    In Lithuanian:
    1. n. žagsėjimas
    v. žagsėti
    2.
    n. mikčiojimas
    v. mikčioti

    Thanks Trisia!
     
  27. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Greek:

    «Λόξυγγας» [ˈlɔ.k͜si.ŋgas] (masc.), possibly from the ancient 3rd declension masc. «λύγξ» lúnk͜s (nom. sing.), «λυγγός» lŭngós (gen. sing.) --> hiccup (PIE *sluk-/*slug- to swallow cf W. llyncu, to swallow, Pol. łkać. to sob).
    «Λύγξ > *λύγξυγγας > λόξυγγας»
     
  28. Dymn

    Dymn Senior Member

    Singlot in Catalan, related then to Portuguese soluço and Italian singhiozzo.
     
  29. Penyafort

    Penyafort Senior Member

    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    And to Spanish singulto (which is technical and never used but exists).
     
  30. TheCrociato91 Senior Member

    Brescia, Italy
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Same in Italian. Except that I wouldn't say it's never used but it's extremely rare and possibly regional (my grandma speaks more dialect than actual Italian but she basically only says singulto instead of singhiozzo; or, when speaking dialect, sanglót, which looks very French-like :D ).
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
  31. Sardokan1.0

    Sardokan1.0 Senior Member

    Sardigna
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Sardinian, where I live is :

    Taccullitta

    in other areas :

    Tuccullitta / ticcullitta / tziccullitta /singullitta

    P.S.
    In Sardinian is feminine


    I wonder if it could be onomatopoeic. Let's take for example "Taccullitta", in Sardinian language it's also the diminutive of "Taccula", a bird of the corvidae family. Coincidence, the call of this bird sounds like the human hiccup.
     
  32. Penyafort

    Penyafort Senior Member

    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Interesting. Because in Catalan, singlot is hiccup but sanglot is a sob. At least in the standard, because to me they're both the same thing and I've always considered it a variation.
     

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