Hier / Da

  • Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    stroggyy said:
    Hallo!

    I'd like to know the difference between hier and da.

    Danke!
    "Hier" is 'here' in German, while 'there' is best translated to German by "dort". Depending on specific contexts "da" is used to refer to both 'here' as well as 'there'. Two examples:
    (1) When being given something that took a while to deliver (to organize, to print out or whatever) you might be adressed to with the words "Here is your ticket/copy/..." - which in German is either "Hier ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/..." or "Da ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/ ...".
    (2) "Go down XXX road about 200m, you'll find a supermarket to the left. There you can also buy newspapers." - in German: "Gehe ca. 200m auf der XXX-Straße in diese Richtung, dann kommst du zu einem Supermarkt auf der linken Seite. Dort kannst du auch Zeitungen kaufen." or: " .... Da kannst du auch Zeitungen kaufen."

    To be on the safe side, however, I would recommend to use "da" when the English translation has 'there', since the usage as translation of 'here' is rather limited to objects which are pretty close or can be touched.

    Ralf
     

    ITA

    Senior Member
    argentina español
    Da :arrow: es un adverbio:ahí,allí,allá.(wo ist das Buch?,da, auf dem tisch)
    Hier :arrow: aquí,en esta.(hier bin ich:aquí estoy).
    Creo no haberme equivocado y como siempre espero a los expertos ;)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Ralf said:
    "Hier" is 'here' in German, while 'there' is best translated to German by "dort". Depending on specific contexts "da" is used to refer to both 'here' as well as 'there'. Two examples:
    (1) When being given something that took a while to deliver (to organize, to print out or whatever) you might be adressed to with the words "Here is your ticket/copy/..." - which in German is either "Hier ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/..." or "Da ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/ ...".
    (2) "Go down XXX road about 200m, you'll find a supermarket to the left. There you can also buy newspapers." - in German: "Gehe ca. 200m auf der XXX-Straße in diese Richtung, dann kommst du zu einem Supermarkt auf der linken Seite. Dort kannst du auch Zeitungen kaufen." or: " .... Da kannst du auch Zeitungen kaufen."

    To be on the safe side, however, I would recommend to use "da" when the English translation has 'there', since the usage as translation of 'here' is rather limited to objects which are pretty close or can be touched.

    Ralf
    In this example:

    (1) When being given something that took a while to deliver (to organize, to print out or whatever) you might be adressed to with the words "Here's/there's your ticket/copy/..." - which in German is either "Hier ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/..." or "Da ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/ ...".


    The words are interchangeable in English too.

    Other things like this:

    There/here you go…

    Here's/there's the answer I'm looking for.

    It's very idiomatic. In cases when you are making a clear distinction, then English and German both become more precise, I think:

    Here/hier
    There/dort-da
    Over there-darüber (although there is no LEO entry for that)

    I BELIEVE this is just another case in which German and English are suprisingly close.

    Gaer
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    gaer said:
    ... Here/hier
    There/dort-da
    Over there-darüber (although there is no LEO entry for that)

    I BELIEVE this is just another case in which German and English are suprisingly close.

    Gaer
    Hello Gaer,

    I guess you are right. I had not been aware that there/here could be used almost interchangeably in English (at least in your examples). Therefore my explanation might have been not that accurate. Any way, I'd agree to your conclusion to use "da" rather for "dort" (= there) instead of "hier" (= here). My first example should therefore be assumed as an exception.

    In addition to your explanation I would suggest to translate 'over there' by "da drüben", at least in the context of pointing some directions.

    Ralf
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    gaer said:
    In this example:

    (1) When being given something that took a while to deliver (to organize, to print out or whatever) you might be adressed to with the words "Here's/there's your ticket/copy/..." - which in German is either "Hier ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/..." or "Da ist dein Ticket/deine Kopie/ ...".


    The words are interchangeable in English too.

    Other things like this:

    There/here you go…

    Here's/there's the answer I'm looking for.

    It's very idiomatic. In cases when you are making a clear distinction, then English and German both become more precise, I think:

    Here/hier
    There/dort-da
    Over there-darüber (although there is no LEO entry for that)

    I BELIEVE this is just another case in which German and English are suprisingly close.

    Gaer
    Well, let me compare it with German: We also have these two words are often colloquially interchangeble.

    Let me suggest two sentences:

    Da :tick: ist deine Eintrittskarte.
    --> Hier ist deine Eintrittskarte.

    Da :tick: gibt es Eis!
    --> Hier gibt es Eis!

    If you show to the object you mean with your finger or you have it in front of you, you are able to interchange them. Look at my examples and consider them. But be aware it's only COLLOQUIAL. :warning:
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    Well, let me compare it with German: We also have these two words are often colloquially interchangeble.

    Let me suggest two sentences:

    Da :tick: ist deine Eintrittskarte.
    --> Hier ist deine Eintrittskarte.

    Da :tick: gibt es Eis!
    --> Hier gibt es Eis!

    If you show to the object you mean with your finger or you have it in front of you, you are able to interchange them. Look at my examples and consider them. But be aware it's only COLLOQUIAL. :warning:
    Such uses of here/there in English are also coloquial, I think. :)

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Ralf said:
    Hello Gaer,

    I guess you are right. I had not been aware that there/here could be used almost interchangeably in English (at least in your examples). Therefore my explanation might have been not that accurate. Any way, I'd agree to your conclusion to use "da" rather for "dort" (= there) instead of "hier" (= here). My first example should therefore be assumed as an exception.

    In addition to your explanation I would suggest to translate 'over there' by "da drüben", at least in the context of pointing some directions.

    Ralf
    Right! Da drüben is better, I think. I could not think of it. But once again, isn't it interesting how close our languages are? Da drüben, "there over", only the order is changed!

    Gaer
     
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