high conversion rate

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I heard of this phrase "conversion rate" when I was watching soccer games, it says that when a scorer get the ball from his teammate, if this man can shoot the ball into the net, he has a conversion rate. Let's say he got 100 passes from his teammates and 30 into the net, he has a 30% conversion rate.

I've been thinking if I can use it in language areas, let's say I've learned a lot English words, phrases or English in general, however, I need to use the knowledge, if I use very well, can I say:

I have a high conversion rate of English. (This is just my thought, I want to make a change in my English writing by using new phrases and words I make up)

Thanks a lot
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In order to have a conversion rate, you have to converts something from one status to a second status.

    So the soccer player converts the passed ball into a ball that has scored a point.

    They also refer to conversion rates for "leads" in sales.

    An advertisement generates "leads" (names of potential buyers) and they attempt to convert those leads (names of potential buyers) into purchases by those buyers.

    But what would your English language "conversion" be converting? I, like hepresto, can't think of a logical answer to that question.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think the OP is very clear about what they want say, but I agree that "conversion rate" is not appropriate in the given sentence.

    The OP appears to be talking about "passive vocabulary" and "active vocabulary" and the learner's ability to transition from the first to the second.

    Although this might be regarded as some kind of "conversion", I cannot see how a "rate" would be calculated in any meaningful way.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think the OP is very clear about what they want say, but I agree that "conversion rate" is not appropriate in the given sentence.

    The OP appears to be talking about "passive vocabulary" and "active vocabulary" and the learner's ability to transition from the first to the second.

    Although this might be regarded as some kind of "conversion", I cannot see how a "rate" would be calculated in any meaningful way.
    Are you referring to "thinking in English" vs "thinking in Cantonese and translating to English"?

    <-----Off-topic comments removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Sorry for the delay:

    I'm afraid not. It doesn't really mean anything.

    And, to be honest, I don't quite understand what you want it to mean.
    But what would your English language "conversion" be converting? I, like hepresto, can't think of a logical answer to that question.
    The OP appears to be talking about "passive vocabulary" and "active vocabulary" and the learner's ability to transition from the first to the second.
    Yes, thank you, Linkway, you answered the question.

    Are you referring to "thinking in English" vs "thinking in Cantonese and translating to English"?
    No, not really.

    Let's say I remember 10 words and idioms, phrases today, and I need to write English articles or go to a club to speak English. I use all of them.

    If I use all of those things I learn, not simply just remembering them, I have a very high "conversion rate" nearly 100% of these already remembered words.

    It's like this, anyway, thanks a lot, everyone.
     
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