high drama or high camp.

hly2004

Banned
chinese
Hi, :)

context:
Some suggest that the young tax and customs officers may be sincere in their pledges. They haven't had the chance to embezzle or receive bribes yet. If the same ceremony is held for those who've already been in powerful positions for years, that will be either high drama or high camp.


Could you tell me the meaning of the blue part?
 
  • duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    High drama - it will be very dramatic or surrounded by controversy/heated discussions. High camp I'm not sure about, camp in this context should mean something of poor taste, something kitchy (camp is a style that deliberately uses kitch in an ironic manner)..
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    My understanding is "it could be very exiting if they have been followed their pledges, or it could be very ironic if they have not been followed their pledges, meanwhile still vow in the ceremony"
    Is that correct?
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    I think what is meant is:

    The young customs officers are still honest and so are being sincere when they make their pledge.

    If the old officers (who have been in the job for years and are corrupt) were to take the pledge they would either protest loudly or be very insencere about it (they would basically be dishonest) and therefore it would be an ironic scene (or a scene in bad taste).

    :)
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Very reasonable, I can understand it clearly.
    Thanks:)

    I guess "High drama" means "in a very high spririt, and sincerely"
    and if "that" represents "the ceremony", then, the setence means "the entire ceremony will be high drama or insincere"
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    That's not how I think about the term high drama.. I think of it as something causing a lot of drama, or being very controversial.

    So in this example, the high drama option would be a big controversy (maybe the old officers refusing to take the pledge), while the high camp option would be that their taking the pledge would be ironic or in poor taste.

    It's an interesting sentence, I'd like to see someone else chime in :)
     

    chesty

    Senior Member
    english
    Hello. I wish to point out that the meaning of the blue text is not immediately obvious, and so hly 2004 should not feel bad about failing to understand a text which was poorly written.
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    The high camp reference in that sentence is definitely confusing, had me puzzled for a bit.. the journalist is probably trying to sound clever..
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    "High camp" has a very specific meaning, and is not nonsense. Here is just about all you ever wanted to know about it, in a long thread we have already had on the subject.
    .
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Ceremony for its own sake, particularly when it becomes more elaborate, is almost always camp. Just look at anything formal the royal family in the UK does: Wearing crowns and regalia, people bowing and curtseying, po faced looks all around, with some twit in the background doing a commentary how the event highlights the mystique of the crown. Utterly laughable and camper than a row of tents!
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    The royal ceremonies in the UK are probably not considered camp by most of the participants, though..

    While in the example provided by hly2004 the senior officers would indeed find their own ceremony campy.
     
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