high-maintenance and push-over

nasridine

Senior Member
USA
Chinese, China
I was watching Friends yesterday. Monica was called"High-maintenance" while Rachel is called "push-over". What exactly do these two words mean?
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi nasridine,

    HERE is another thread that explains "high-maintenance" very well.

    We really should start another thread about "push-over." In brief, however, a push-over is someone who is gullible and easily persuaded by others.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    high maintenance = she requires a lot of attention and care

    pushover = someone who is easily convinced, controlled, or manipulated. they have little will power.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "High maintenance" is an adjective, although its use with the linking verb "be" makes it function like a noun.

    Susan's not really high-maintenance. In fact, she's very down-to-earth and easy-going.

    Monica, on the other hand, is very high-maintenance.

    Push-over is a noun.
    Rachel is such a push-over. She'll believe anything you tell her.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I think "push-over" has less to do with believing everything people tell you and more to do with letting people "walk all over you" - easily submitting to pressure, bending over backwards to please people, not really thinking for yourself.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    GenJen54 said:
    "High maintenance" is an adjective, although its use with the linking verb "be" makes it function like a noun.
    I'd say it's the other way around. Literally high (adj) + maintenance (noun0, but in "she's very high-maintenance " the subjective complement is very adjectival in function-- otherwise how could it be modified by the adverb "very?" Compare "she's very neurotic." "She's a self-starter" is more a nominal objective complement-- i.e., "self-starter" is clearly a noun.

    Why has no one mentioned that a pushover is an easy lay? To me that's the primary definition, by far. Susie Round-Heels.
    .
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    foxfirebrand said:
    Why has no one mentioned that a pushover is an easy lay? To me that's the primary definition, by far. Susie Round-Heels.
    .

    This, sadly, says more about the quality of the company foxfirebrand keeps, than it does about his vocabulary! :D
     
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