High note

Antonio

Senior Member
Mexico/Spanish
Hi Group,

What does "High note" means? and I read this week in the newspaper something that I wanna quote about this article "I'm leaving on a high note"
 
  • te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    Hi Group,

    What does "High note" means? and I read this week in the newspaper something that I wanna quote about this article "I'm leaving on a high note"
    Hi Antonio...
    Me again..getting tired of talking to me yet..:D
    It means that you are leaving on good terms...
    Or
    You did a good job and are leaving it as is..
    The rest of the context might tell me more..
    te gato;)
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    But why do you said "High Note", I don't get it. This is common to say or hear in spoken English or not?

    Hi Antonio;
    I can only speek for myself...but yes we say it here...
    "I'm leaving on a high note."--"I'm leaving on good terms"--"I'm leaving in a good mood"

    te gato;)
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    You might hear it every now and then, but it is not commonly said. It means that at the end of something, everyone was happy. I have no idea how this phrase started, but to understand it, think about music. The songs that end with the high notes are usually happy, cheerful songs. They end on a high note.

    The songs that end with deeper, lower tones, are "ending on a sad note." A tragedy ends on a sad note.

    If you want to change the subject, you can also say, "On a different note, ..."

    :)
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    Ahhh ok, now I understand, why the "high note" yes, you're right and it really make sense to me now. So, "On a different note" means to "change the subject" or "can we change the subject"

    "Can we get off the subject" and "Can we drop the subject" means the same thing, right? Is to stop talking about the subject that means to change the subject or not necessarily?

    And finally, "every now and then" means the same thing as"once in a while" or not?
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Antonio said:
    Ahhh ok, now I understand, why the "high note" yes, you're right and it really make sense to me now. So, "On a different note" means to "change the subject" or "can we change the subject"
    Well, you are not telling the other person to change the subject. You are also not asking for permission to change the subject. You simply are changing the subject. On a different note, my feet are cold. :D
    "Can we get off the subject" and "Can we drop the subject" means the same thing, right? Is to stop talking about the subject that means to change the subject or not necessarily?
    Yes, they mean the same thing.
    And finally, "every now and then" means the same thing as"once in a while" or not?
    Yes, they mean the same thing, also. You might also hear this said as "every now and again," or
    "from time to time."

    You can also say something ended on a happy note, the same as on a high note.


    :)
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    Sharon said:
    You can also say something ended on a happy note, the same as on a high note.

    I'm sorry I didn't catch that last thing that you mentioned. Can you please give an example to understand better the meaning and the usage of "high note"?

    How do you call in English a person how changes the subject in a snap over and over again in the same conversation with one or two people?
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    How did I confuse you? A happy song ends on a high note. A happy song ends on a happy note. It's the same thing.

    I was already late to work when I got a flat tire, but it ended on a high note, because I found fifty dollars on the side of the road.

    I was already late to work when I got a flat tire , but it ended on a happy note, because I found fifty dollars on the side of the road.

    :confused: I need to think about that type of person for a minute. I'm not sure we have a name for them.

    :)
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    on the American Idol official website, there is a banner that caught my attention, that says "Don't miss a note" what does this phrase means?
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'm assuming that American Idol is about music so "don't miss a note" means don't miss one little bit, don't miss any action, that sort of thing
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    cirrus said:
    I'm assuming that American Idol is about music so "don't miss a note" means don't miss one little bit, don't miss any action, that sort of thing

    I don't know what it means exactly this phrase. It could mean, don't miss any move, tv show or what does this phrase mean?
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Antonio said:
    I don't know what it means exactly this phrase. It could mean, don't miss any move, tv show or what does this phrase mean?
    Don't miss a note is their way of saying "stay tuned" to the program. Because it's about music, as cirrus explained, they have used a musical way to say it by saying don't miss a [musical] note.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Antonio-
    There are also musical terms used, such as, "He didn't skip a beat."

    American Idol is a musical series in the form of a contest where by the process of elimination, by the end of each season they have come down to the best singer who gets a record contract--or something like that. If I were to try and think of a way to get you to subscribe to my newsletter so that you would get the newest updates without clicking on to the website, I might use the term, "Don't Skip a Note" as a catchy line. After performances that are being critiqued, directors and adjudicators will "give notes." By giving notes, or critiquing the performance, it is hoped that whoever is performing will do so even better next time.

    "Don't skip a note," would then be a double entendre--as you would not be missing a critique--and it also refers to skipping a note in singing.

    Leaving things on a high note is common in my part of the US.
    Leaving things on a happy note is common.
    "Don't skip a note" is uncommon, and more common would be to "not to skip a beat"--but then it would not have a double meaning.

    Hope I've not hit a foul ball that skipped over the fence and landed in the pasture. Good luck on your understanding English phrases. Your questions always make us English speakers think about things that come naturally. It helps us improve command of our own language. Thanks!
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    I'm sorry I didn't catch that last thing that you mentioned. Can you please give an example to understand better the meaning and the usage of "high note"?

    How do you call in English a person how changes the subject in a snap over and over again in the same conversation with one or two people?
    Hey Antonio;
    'High note'...
    "Boy was my day the pits!..I dumped my coffee in my lap..forgot all my important files at home..busted a fingernail..my dog peed on the floor..but it ended on a high note..I got to talk to Antonio before I went to bed.'

    Don't miss a note..
    It just means that you do not miss a thing..
    'Hey! look at that green tree over there.'..."Man, you don't miss a note do you.'
    As fo what do you call a person who changes the subject all the time..mmmm..annoying..a pain in the a**..:D
    maybe.....evasive..you ask them a question..and instead of answering they change the subject...

    te gato;)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Here's the OED on note, sense 7c:

    c. fig. to strike (also hit) a —— note and variants: to express a sentiment, idea, etc., of a specified tone or character; (similarly) to strike (also hit) the right note ; (also) to hit a (high, low, etc.) note : to achieve a specified level of success.

    You can have a right note, a wrong note, and so on. I sing in a choir sometimes, and the high notes can be a problem, and you can't get them right every time, so when I do get them, I feel chuffed with myself. A high note is thus a measure of achievement.
     

    drinkwater

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese Mandarin
    Hi. Here's a sentence from Scientific American podcast (http://goo.gl/3Vq40):

    The mouse songs are admittedly primitive. But the findings left scientists on a high note.

    What does "on a high note" means here? Does it mean the findings excited the scientists?

    Thanks for the help.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    ​Mod note: drinkwater's thread (beginning with post 18) has been merged with another thread about 'a high note'.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi. Here's a sentence from Scientific American podcast (http://goo.gl/3Vq40):

    The mouse songs are admittedly primitive. But the findings left scientists on a high note.

    What does "on a high note" means here? Does it mean the findings excited the scientists?

    Thanks for the help.
    I agree with owlman. It is worth pointing out that this is an intentional pun. Mouse songs are very high-pitched so, by definition, they end on a high note (a high pitched squeak).
     
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