high quality gasoline

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milkalove

Senior Member
Bavarian
Hi everyone,
I have a sentence which I am not so sure about.

Does this sound English to you? :)

The fact that high quality gasoline can be produced in the same process of extracting petrochemicals has given way to the unification of certain companies to exploit their resources better.

Now that I have typed down again, I must admit it sounds indeed veeery strange.
Thanks for your input!
 
  • Gordonedi

    Senior Member
    UK (Scotland) English
    milkalove said:
    Hi everyone,
    I have a sentence which I am not so sure about.

    Does this sound English to you? :)

    The fact that high quality gasoline can be produced in the same process of extracting petrochemicals has given way to the unification of certain companies to exploit their resources better.

    Now that I have typed down again, I must admit it sounds indeed veeery strange.
    Thanks for your input!
    Two comments from me :
    I'm not sure about "given way" in the sentence. Do you mean "led to", where the result is inevitable, or perhaps "enabled" where the companies have a choice ?

    The word "better" should appear earlier in the sentence : as in "to better exploit their resources".

    :)
     

    milkalove

    Senior Member
    Bavarian
    Gordonedi said:
    Two comments from me :
    I'm not sure about "given way" in the sentence. Do you mean "led to", where the result is inevitable, or perhaps "enabled" where the companies have a choice ?

    The word "better" should appear earlier in the sentence : as in "to better explit their resources".

    :)
    Hi Gordonedi,
    First of all, thanks for replying.
    Well, the companies did have a choice, so I suppose it would be better to say "enabled". As far as "better" goes, I put it before exploit before. However, Word was not happy with it and underlined it. So I moved it to the back of the sentence. I'll ignore Word and put it back to where it was.
    Thanks again for your help!
     

    Gordonedi

    Senior Member
    UK (Scotland) English
    milkalove said:
    Hi Gordonedi,
    As far as "better" goes, I put it before exploit before. However, Word was not happy with it and underlined it. So I moved it to the back of the sentence. I'll ignore Word and put it back to where it was.
    There's a Master and Servant lesson in there somewhere ! The English language in all its colourful variants needs to be cherished and not standardised by adoption of rules selected by Bill Gates' programmers. :rolleyes:
     

    psicutrinius

    Senior Member
    Spanish / Spain
    One other thing, milkalove: Do they (the authors) really mean that the companies MERGED, or rather that they POOLED their resources?
     

    milkalove

    Senior Member
    Bavarian
    psicutrinius said:
    One other thing, milkalove: Do they (the authors) really mean that the companies MERGED, or rather that they POOLED their resources?
    Hi psicutrinius,

    No, they didn't merge, they just pool their resources to establish a mutually beneficial "relationship".
     

    psicutrinius

    Senior Member
    Spanish / Spain
    In this case, I would substitute "unification of certain companies" by "resource pooling by certain companies..."
     

    boonognog

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    ...to exploit their resources better...
    And I can explain why Word did not like the adverb placed between the infinitive 'to' and the verb 'exploit'. That is called a split infinitive, and it is generally considered incorrect in formal writing. Informally, people do it all the time. In fact, I agree with Gordonedi that the placement of the adverb (or adjective, as it were) affects the feel, if not the actual meaning, of certain phrases. But in this case, that is a 'legitimate' catch by Word that you might consider respecting. (Remember, though, the ultimate decision should be 'who are you writing for?')
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I am uncomfortable with this part--

    process of extracting petrochemicals
    Gasoline and other distillates are normally spoken of as being refined, rather than extracted. We don't have enough context to be sure if extraction is the appropriate process name for the production of the other petrochemicals.
     
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