high school diploma us-gb

  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In the UK, there is nothing that might be the equivalent of a high school diploma, whatever that is.
    There are the results of formal examinations in specific subjects, but no overall diploma.
     

    FrankElBueno

    Senior Member
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA, English
    Ok, well then the question would be what is the equivalent of high school (in the US for 14-18 years), before you go on to university or vocational training or whatever.
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    A high school diploma is a piece of paper saying that you completed high school. It usually has a stamp and signatures on it.

    What happens when people graduate from high school?
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Unless things have changed in the last few years, students don't "graduate" from high school in the UK, there is no ceremony, diploma etc. Students take end of school exams (in their particular chosen subjects) called A Levels and get the results at around the end of school.

    There is a long article about moves to change this on the BBC (from 2004). I don't think anything has come of it has it?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/3526309.stm

    This particular mole took A levels but left school halfway through, and that was many years ago, even in Mole years, so perhaps I'm not the person to answer...
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    I know what happens in the US, I live here. :) I was asking panj and other people who live in the UK.
     

    edval89

    Senior Member
    United States/English
    I think "secondary school" is roughly what you are looking for, Frank. I'm not sure (as you've probably seen) if it's exactly the same though.
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    A high school diploma is a piece of paper saying that you completed high school. It usually has a stamp and signatures on it.

    What happens when people graduate from high school?
    The UK does not have "high school". It has secondary schools. When pupils come to the end of the secondary schooling, they take a series of examinations to acquire General Certificates in Secondary Education (GCSE) in various subjects. There is no form of "diploma".
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Now I'm curious. In the United States, many jobs (including the armed forces) and almost every university will not even consider an applicant unless he can prove that he completed his secondary education. (That is, completed it successfully, instead of failing out or dropping out of school before his education was complete.) The document with which one can prove that one has completed one's secondary education is called a high school diploma. If one did drop out, one may later take an examination and receive a "general equivalency diploma", or GED, which indicates that one has shown that one has acquired an equivalent to the education one would have received by staying in school.

    In the UK, is there any sort of similar single document that attests to the fact that one has completed one's secondary education successfully, and is eligible to be considered as an applicant by universities, or the armed forces, or employers? Or don't universities, or the military, or other employers, care much about that sort of thing?
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I know nobody asked what we do down here in upsidedown-land, but we usually call it high-school, occasionally secondary school, and the final exams are called different things in different states. Helpful, non?

    When I was finishing Year 12 (final year of high-school), for example, it was called your TEE (Tertiary Entrance Exam). Before that it was called TAE (Tertiary Admission (?) Exam) and it changed to something else later, to which I didn't pay much attention.

    The TEE/TAE/what-have-you is made up of exams in all of the subjects a student is taking, plus an SAT exam which gives a levelling standard mark. At the end you get a grade based on all those parts.

    Gah! Even I don't understand it!!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In the UK, is there any sort of similar single document that attests to the fact that one has completed one's secondary education successfully, and is eligible to be considered as an applicant by universities, or the armed forces, or employers? Or don't universities, or the military, or other employers, care much about that sort of thing?
    To answer GreenWhiteBlue's questions: no, universities and employers are interested in the type and level of qualifications achieved, rather than school attendance as such.

    Loob
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    The UK does not have "high school". It has secondary schools. When pupils come to the end of the secondary schooling, they take a series of examinations to acquire General Certificates in Secondary Education (GCSE) in various subjects. There is no form of "diploma".
    This is news to me. My secondary school had the term "high school" in it's name, and as far as I know it still does, as do most other UK high schools that I know of.
    As for documents to prove you went to school, I received GCSE certificates for about 10 subjects at age 16, and A-level certificates for 4 subjects at the age of 18. Employers and universities usually ask to see these certificates, especially those pertinent to the position. It's possible I have a piece of paper with my attendance record on it somewhere.
    Once you have a university degree or a reasonable amount of work experience these things are seldom required.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    It seems that although in the UK individual schools are often called "____ High School", the term for that level of education in general is not "high school" but "secondary school" or "secondary education".

    It seems to be similar in that although Universities have colleges, and you may very well attend a college for your University education, we do not call the university level of education "college" in the general way that Americans do (except perhaps in imitation).

    As for diplomas and certificates, certificates are certainly issued for each subject passed at A Level and GCSE (O Level as was) as liliput points out. I have a bunch of these somewhere, too. However (and this is Ecossaise's point) there is not at present an equivalent of a high school diploma, or Baccalaureat which testifies to you having attended high school level education in general. This is the difference.
     

    edval89

    Senior Member
    United States/English
    So I'm an International Baccalaureate candidate (the program is at the high school level) here in the US, and I know that it also exists in the UK. When I find out that I qualify for the diploma (hopefully!), I'm assuming I'll be receiving an actual physical IB diploma. Has anyone in the UK heard of the IB diploma?
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    In the UK, there is nothing that might be the equivalent of a high school diploma, whatever that is.
    There are the results of formal examinations in specific subjects, but no overall diploma.
    My dearly beloved has something that looks very much like a Diploma or Certificate

    It's a nice piece of heavy card:

    Universities of Bath, Bristol, Exeter, Reading, Southampton and Surry
    [Row of Shields of the Universities]
    Southern Universities Joint Board of School Examinations
    GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCTION

    xxxxx born xxxxxx
    entered by
    xxxx Grammar School
    passed in the following subjects in the
    examination held in Summer 19xx
    Advanced Level Grade Ordinary Level
    xxxxxx xxxxxxx
    xxxxxx xxxxxxx

    signature
    Chairman.

    The Department of Education and Science accepts the Examination as reaching the approved standard.
    signature
    Under Secretary


    It's not quite as spiffy as the parchment you get for a degree, but almost worth framing.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    So I'm an International Baccalaureate candidate (the program is at the high school level) here in the US, and I know that it also exists in the UK. When I find out that I qualify for the diploma (hopefully!), I'm assuming I'll be receiving an actual physical IB diploma. Has anyone in the UK heard of the IB diploma?
    Yes. The IB is a well known A-level equivalent qualification. It's certainly accepted by UK universities.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    My dearly beloved has something that looks very much like a Diploma or Certificate

    It's a nice piece of heavy card:

    Universities of Bath, Bristol, Exeter, Reading, Southampton and Surry
    [Row of Shields of the Universities]
    Southern Universities Joint Board of School Examinations
    GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCTION

    xxxxx born xxxxxx
    entered by
    xxxx Grammar School
    passed in the following subjects in the
    examination held in Summer 19xx
    Advanced Level Grade Ordinary Level
    xxxxxx xxxxxxx
    xxxxxx xxxxxxx

    signature
    Chairman.

    The Department of Education and Science accepts the Examination as reaching the approved standard.
    signature
    Under Secretary


    It's not quite as spiffy as the parchment you get for a degree, but almost worth framing.
    Yes, you are right, rather than separate certificates all the results are put one one piece of paper, but this is still not a high school diploma as such, it's really a single document certifying passes in the named subjects.

    My GCE O Level certificate is in this form with the 5 or 6 grades on it. I also have a separate certificates for CSE Grade 1 passes (I won't go into that, neither of these examination levels exist any more). These examinations were taken at the end of mandatory schooling, (age 16) but there are another 2 years of optional schooling still available at that point, so it is not really much like a graduation certificate at all.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Yes, you are right, rather than separate certificates all the results are put one one piece of paper, but this is still not a high school diploma as such, it's really a single document certifying passes in the named subjects.

    My GCE O Level certificate is in this form with the 5 or 6 grades on it. I also have a separate certificates for CSE Grade 1 passes (I won't go into that, neither of these examination levels exist any more). These examinations were taken at the end of mandatory schooling, (age 16) but there are another 2 years of optional schooling still available at that point, so it is not really much like a graduation certificate at all.
    Yes, the results are only on the same paper if all your subjects are with the same examining board. For example, my maths GCSE is on a separate certificate to the others because the school chose a different maths syllabus.
     

    mx_ell

    New Member
    england
    sorry to dig this thread up again but i would like to know if i need to do A levels in order to have the equivalent of a high school diploma in America or if GCSEs will do?
     
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