High society , working class , middle class

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gayyyyk

Senior Member
Russian
Hello ! Do we use “the” with “high society” ,“middle class” ,“working class” ?
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The sentence will determine whether you need "the". It matters if it's a noun or an adjective.
     

    gayyyyk

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The sentence will determine whether you need "the". It matters if it's a noun or an adjective.
    No , in general , as a noun .. not an adjective . For instance - “today (the) high/ middle/working class is not very happy because of something”
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Although "the upper classes", "the middle classes" and "the working classes" are often used as noun phrases, "the high class" would NOT generally be used as a noun phrase - it would usually be used adjectivally to modify a different noun.

    Eg:. She runs the high class restaurant in Ockleton village.
     

    gayyyyk

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Although "the upper classes", "the middle classes" and "the working classes" are often used as noun phrases, "the high class" would NOT generally be used as a noun phrase - it would usually be used adjectivally to modify a different noun.

    Eg:. She runs the high class restaurant in Ockleton village.
    Do we normally say “a working/middle/high class” meaning as a simple noun (in general) ?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Do we normally say “a working/middle/high class” meaning as a simple noun (in general) ?
    By putting the 3 words together with "/", you are asssuming the 3 words are used the same way in noun phrases. That is incorrect. The 3 words are not used the same way. Linkway told you that in post #6.

    I don’t understand, in LDOCE it is used “the working class” meaning people in general
    Did LDOCE use "the high class" meaning rich people in general?
     

    gayyyyk

    Senior Member
    Russian
    By putting the 3 words together with "/", you are asssuming the 3 words are used the same way in noun phrases. That is incorrect. The 3 words are not used the same way. Linkway told you that in post #6.



    Did LDOCE use "the high class" meaning rich people in general?
    Got it, thanks
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    A lot depends on which country and culture you are talking about.

    In British contexts, "the working class" traditionally refers to skilled and unskilled manual workers, but there are other relevant aspects such as lifestyle, social attitudes and educational attainment.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Note also that "middle class" in British contexts is different from "middle class" in American contexts.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    High class is an adjective, often hyphenated. The noun is the upper classes, the nobility, high society or the ruling class, depending on context. (Other politically biased synonyms are available...)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In my experience, a given person may use one or two of these but not use all three. You can't ask "Do people say working class/middle class/high society?" any more than you can ask "Do Russians eat potatoes/chicken/pencils?" and expect a simple yes-or-no answer. It's yes to some parts of the question, no to other parts.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
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