highly tuned to their domain - domain-specific - <domain-generalized>

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Apparently "highly tuned to their domain" means "domain-specific." And the author continues with "and cannot be generalised to other problems without significant human effort."

Does "generalised" here mean "domain-generalised"? Though "domain-generalised" appears exactly to be the counterpart of "domain-specific," I am not sure whether "domain-generalized" is proper English.


Thanks in advance

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The study of computer chess is as old as computer science itself. Babbage, Turing, Shannon, and von Neumann devised hardware, algorithms and theory to analyse and play the game of chess. Chess subsequently became the grand challenge task for a generation of artificial intelligence researchers, culminating in high-performance computer chess programs that perform at superhuman level (9, 13). However, these systems are highly tuned to their domain, and cannot be generalised to other problems without significant human effort.

-arXiv

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Source (PDF version)

Note: The grammar detector of our Forum deems "generalised" to be a misspelling. But I used "generalized" and "generalised" interchangeably here.
 
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  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Apparently "highly tuned to their domain" means "domain-specific."
    Yes. In this context it means the domain or field of chess.
    Does "generalised" here mean "domain-generalised"?
    The phrase "cannot be generalised to other problems" means that the general or broad principles/concepts of the programs cannot be adapted to deal with non-chess problems, or problems outside the field of chess.
    The grammar detector of our Forum deems "generalised" to be a misspelling.
    In general, in such words, "...ised" is BE while "...ized" is AmE.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Since "domain-specific" refers to "being specific to the domain", so "domain-generalized" would comparably refer to "being generalized to the domain" - well, a question rises from here: I want it to mean "a general principle shared by other domains," but "being generalized to the domain" seems to too awkward to me to convey the meaning.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Note: The grammar detector of our Forum deems "generalised" to be a misspelling. But I used "generalized" and "generalised" interchangeably here.
    Any spelling checker you have is in your browser.
    well, a question rises from here: I want it to mean "a general principle shared by other domains," but "being generalized to the domain" seems to too awkward to me to convey the meaning.
    A general principle shared by all domains is just a "general principle." "Generalized to the domain" is contradictory. I'm not sure what you're trying to say.
     
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