Hijazi Arabic: قيد - قِد (already)

Idris

Senior Member
Urdu (Pakistan)
Is قيد for "already" still used in Urban Hijazi Arabic? Like in الجو قيده حر "The weather is already hot" and قيدي شفته "I already saw him".

Please say if it is used in other dialects as well.
 
  • rayloom

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Hijazi Arabic)
    قيد giid is originally from قد qad.
    It's still commonly used in Urban Hijazi Arabic.
    It's used in other dialects as well in different forms and to indicate slightly differing meanings.
    In other Saudi dialects it's used as قيد and قد. In Egyptian it's the origin of أد in أديني for example. أديني جيت
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    قيد giid is originally from قد qad.
    It's still commonly used in Urban Hijazi Arabic.
    It's used in other dialects as well in different forms and to indicate slightly differing meanings.
    In other Saudi dialects it's used as قيد and قد. In Egyptian it's the origin of أد in أديني for example. أديني جيت
    I don't know why you guys are spelling it قييييييد. No one ever pronounces it قيد; it's قِد with a short vowel.

    It's used in every dialect in the Arabian Peninsula that I know of to one extent or another. The usage in Urban Hijazi is the same as in non-Urban Hijazi and in southwestern Arabia, etc.
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    قيد راح؟
    قيد جا؟

    I don't think so. Perhaps the vowel is lengthened slightly under certain circumstances (i.e. when attached to a pronoun) but it is essentially قد not قييييد. I've never seen it written قيد online either.
     

    rayloom

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Hijazi Arabic)
    As you said, it's prolonged in certain circumstance. Here it's always prolonged when an enclitic pronoun is attached to it.

    قيدَني وصلت (giidani is commoner than giidni)
    قيدو (قيده) راح.

    Also I wouldn't write the yaa usually except under this circumstance.

    Other circumstances where it's pronounce giid is when the d is followed by a vowel, while if there's a sukuun on the d, it's pronounced gid in Urban Hijazi Arabic.
    gid jaa
    gid raa7
    giido jaa
    giido raa7
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    The same use exists in اللهجة الحسانية (Morocco-Mauritania). It can means "have you already+verb" (قد شفت الفيلم ذا؟) or in a different context, to say that something fits/suits or doesn't suit/fit you (الكلام هذا ماهو قدك). It is pronounced "ged". But as far as I know, we do not add any pronoun to it.

    I don't know if it exists in other Maghreb's areas but I guess yes.
     
    Last edited:

    rayloom

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Hijazi Arabic)
    Hello Hemza

    The first is from the particle qad and is used similarly in Hijazi Arabic.
    قد شفت الفيلم هدا

    The other example is from the Arabic noun qadd meaning size or measure, it is also used to refer to stature. Qadd is also used similarly in most varieties of colloquial Arabic.
    اللبس هذا قدّك
    In Egyptian Arabic it's pronounced أدّ.
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Hello Hemza

    The first is from the particle qad and is used similarly in Hijazi Arabic.
    قد شفت الفيلم هدا
    Hello :). Yes, when I said that I don't know if others parts of the Maghreb use it, I was pointing at this particle (sorry I was unclear).

    The other example is from the Arabic noun qadd meaning size or measure, it is also used to refer to stature. Qadd is also used similarly in most varieties of colloquial Arabic.
    اللبس هذا قدّك
    In Egyptian Arabic it's pronounced أدّ.
    I know about this one being used in other dialects and actually, I was a bit wrong, it is not "to fit/to suit" (which would be لاق/يليق) but rather "to have the stature to" as you said and the example you used for clothes is also used as well. We may also repeat it twice to say that two things are at the same size/tall (قد قد) or to say for example, "this trousers is at my size"=هذا السروال قدي
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I don't speak Hijazi Arabic, but I do believe the two قد here are very different, and are taken from two different words in Classical Arabic. The first one (قد شفت الفيلم هدا) is حرف يفيد التحقيق, whereas the other one (الكلام هذا ماهو قدك and اللبس هذا قدّك) is اسم يجمع على قداد وقدود and it means (in classical Arabic) amount or size or stature. I don't think you should confuse the two even if they are pronounced similarly. The first one is مبني على السكون and never changes the sukun in the end, whereas the second one is generally مُعرَب, but we don't see that in colloquial because we usually drop the harakat at the end of words.
     
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