Hindi: आयेजा-आयेजा

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

Does आयेजा-आयेजा mean anything?
It is from a song by Ritviz called "Liggi" (which, BTW, doesn't mean anything by the author's own admission).
The video clip happens while a girl relaxes and fools around right after her wedding night, although the lyrics are more somber, suggesting some sort of broken relationship.

अब तो आयेजा-आयेजा
हमको लेजायेजा-आयेजा
अब तो आयेजा
हमको लेजायेजा


Lyrics sites give something like "come, come and take me"
Maybe it is some sort of playful contraction of आ जा ( and therefore ले जा - आ जा )?

[Ritviz's lyrics are known for being somewhat free-formed]
[sample Youtube video: 6BYIKEH0RCQ at 0:45]


[EDIT: it might be relevant that the previous stanza says that he dreams about the "आने-जाने वाले" standing still]



Thanks in advance for any orientation
 
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  • desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    I haven’t heard the song, but the words should be आएगा/आयेगा and ले जाएगा/जायेगा. You probably either misheard it or it was miswritten somewhere. I assume the lyrics make sense to you now?
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    I also hear jaa in these lines, not gaa. The only way I see of making syntactic sense of these lines are as tuu-level imperatives of the [oblique perfective + jaanaa] = "to keep on doing ~" construction. In other words,

    ab to aae jaa, aae jaa​
    hamko le jaae jaa, aae jaa​

    If that's the case, aae jaa = keep on coming, hamko le jaae jaa = keep on taking me away. Since it's Ritviz, I'm disinclined to think too hard about whether this syntactic construction really is the most natural in context :p

    It's possible that what I've transcribed as post-comma aae jaa's above are just semantically empty echoes of the kaafiyaa(/qaafiyah), but that explanation makes about as much sense to me as just parsing them as repetitions of the "keep on coming."
     
    Last edited:

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    In every and all lyrics site I found, it was "आयेजा", but they don't have the benefit of the scholarly gentlemen in here :) .
     
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