Hindi: मेरे लई के

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

I am having some difficulty with this seemingly simple chorus of the song "Dua Karo", from the upcoming dance film "Street Dancer 3"
There isn't much context to speak of. The singer regrets having alienated his close ones, and asks that "today someone pray for him".

aaNsuu tham jaae mere
baat sun le vah xudaa ...
[Chorus]
ke aaj koii duaa karo mere laii ! (repeated several times)


Is "ke aaj" in this case a shortening of "aaj ke din"?
And what on earth is "laii"? An alternative spelling of "mere liye"?
Or are the 3 words related?

Please orient me.

PS: I want that ke to be कि, but not a single lyrics site agrees with me :(
 
  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Is "ke aaj" in this case a shortening of "aaj ke din"?
    No.
    PS: I want that ke to be कि, but not a single lyrics site agrees with me :(
    The lyrics sites go with what they can hear in this case. Unfortunately the e-sign they use is long e, not a short one. Hindi spelling is कि indeed, but I think most BW film songs are either in Urdu or often have an Urdu touch to them, and this might be the reason for their ke instead of ki. Just speculation.
    And what on earth is "laii"? An alternative spelling of "mere liye"?
    Argh, how to tell you, it must be that it was supposed to act as Punjabi lacing... in addition to Urdu. I think they could have got their inspiration from somewhere these both are spoken and wanted to express it somehow, otherwise I can't see rhyme or reason for 'laii'.

    Disclaimer: I'm making these comments without having listened to the song under discussion.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "laii" makes no sense to a Hindi speaker - maybe wanting to seem Punjabi?

    The first one means "ki" (that).
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    Hindi कि is supposed to be pronounced with a short “i” and is correctly pronounced in the song. But many Hindi speakers in casual conversation pronounce कि the same as or almost the same as की, so when the correct, careful pronunciation of कि is used, for example in this song, it is sometimes mistranscribed as के on song lyrics sites.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I think I found another instance of that Urdu-ized "ke" where a "kih" is meant.
    In the song "Sanam Re", from the homonym movie:

    xud ko maiN yuuN kho duuN / ke phir na kabhii pauuN

    The singer says "ke", no doubt about it.
    But the meaning is that he will get lost "so that" (kih) he won't be ever found.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    marrish said:
    You can say so. It was discussed in the past.
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    I think I found another instance of that Urdu-ized "ke" where a "kih" is meant.
    Relevant threads:
    As discussed in the aforementioned threads as well as others, Urdu (and Persian) کہ is pronounced as ke/keh and not as ki/kii. As also mentioned by multiple forum members, the majority of lyricists have been Urdu poets and singers/performers also had training in Urdu (if they weren't already Urdu speakers). Therefore, you will find Urdu pronunciations in the majority of Hindi songs and movies. (As previously discussed in older threads, many of the lyricists considered their work to be Urdu poetry. However, perhaps due to sociopolitical reasons, etc. they came to be referred to as Hindi.)
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Hindi speakers also pronounce "ke" (both "ke" and "ki" are pronounced): so there is nothing "Urduized" in that! I myself use "ke" often.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I want to mention something curious that happened to me today:
    I submitted some lyrics to my Urdu professor for correction. They belong to the song "Chal Diye Banda Nawaz", by an Urdu poet (Majrooh Sultanpuri).
    Also, the playback singer is Mohammad Rafi, who is considered the epitome of good diction.
    At some point, the song goes:

    माना कि बिगड़े है मेरे नसीबمانا کِہ بِگڑے ہیں میرے نصیبGranted, my fortune is spoiled
    उल्फ़त न समझे आमिर-ओ-ग़रीबاُلفت نہ سمجھے امیر و غریب(but) love doesn't understand (about) rich and poor

    Notice that I tend to put the vowel marks in Urdu.
    Now, the maanaa kih is clearly کِہ / कि
    Bur Mr. Rafi unmistakenly, resoundingly, pronounces it as "ke".

    So what my professor does is, he corrects my کِہ and writes it as simply کہ

    :cool:
     
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