Hindi: यीशु मसीह का प्रचार

Helen White

Senior Member
Chinese - Taiwanese
Hi all,
A friend sent " यीशु मसीह का प्रचार" to me. I look it up in the dictionary, but "प्रचार" has so many meanings. So I cannot really understand " यीशु मसीह का प्रचार". Is this a phrase or an incomplete sentence which doesn't make sense? Could you tell me the meaning of " यीशु मसीह का प्रचार"? I need your help. Thank you!
 
  • MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi all,
    A friend sent " यीशु मसीह का प्रचार" to me. I look it up in the dictionary, but "प्रचार" has so many meanings. So I cannot really understand " यीशु मसीह का प्रचार". Is this a phrase or an incomplete sentence which doesn't make sense? Could you tell me the meaning of " यीशु मसीह का प्रचार"? I need your help. Thank you!
    The proclamation of Jesus the Messiah.
    (I don't speak Hindi, native or more knowledgeable members can confirm).
     

    D D

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Being a native speaker. I'd say "propagation"
    Is the best word for प्रचार.
    The propagation of shisu messiah
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I thought the word was "yasuu3" (یَسُوع) meaning Jesus. I don't know where यीशु "yiishu" comes from.
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    I thought the word was "yasuu3" (یَسُوع) meaning Jesus. I don't know where यीशु "yiishu" comes from.
    यीशु "yiishu" is used by North Indian Christians and is from Hebrew "yeshua" (Jesus), which is also the source of Arabic "yasuu3" used by Arab Christians and "3iisaa" used by Muslims.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    यीशु "yiishu" is used by North Indian Christians and is from Hebrew "yeshua" (Jesus), which is also the source of Arabic "yasuu3" used by Arab Christians and "3iisaa" used by Muslims.
    Thank you for the clarification. I thought यीशु was perhaps a typo.
     

    Pardesi

    New Member
    Punjabi ਪੰਜਾਬੀ/پنجابی
    Being a native speaker. I'd say "propagation"
    The word propagation carries a negative undertone.
    As @MonsieurGonzalito suggested above proclamation would be fitting or the word teaching - the teaching of Jesus the Messiah.

    यीशु "yiishu" is used by North Indian Christians and is from Hebrew
    In Punjabi the name is commonly translated as Yisuu ਯਿਸੂ يِسوع
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    The word propagation carries a negative undertone.
    As @MonsieurGonzalito suggested above proclamation would be fitting or the word teaching - the teaching of Jesus the Messiah.
    But "prachaar" does mean "propaganda, propagation, publicity" rather than "proclamation" to a native speaker. The default meaning is "publicity, making publicity". Here, I guess, it is more in the sense of prosletysing. For proclamation, one would rather use "ghoshNRaa".
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Despite its current negative undertones, "propaganda" is simply a Latin present active participle, of something feminine, indicating that something "must be propagated". (Same as "delenda est Carthago" = Carthago must be destroyed).

    I believe it was coined by the Catholic Church during the conquest and evangelization of America, referring to the need of converting the aborigines to Christianism: "propaganda est fides". Then, the expression expanded to other spheres.

    Strictly speaking, I believe nowadays "propaganda" is only adequate in the case of broadcasting something political or religious in nature. A TV add selling soap would be just "publicity".

    On the other hand, the Christian New Testament puts special emphasis on the specific time Jesus is "proclaimed" as the Messiah (I believe this happens when he is baptized by John the Baptist, but I am no expert).

    Of course, I believe we are all familiar with that special brand of in-your-face Evangelist, the guy standing on a corner with a bullhorn, ranting all day to no one in particular, for which both these meanings are one and the same.

    Having no idea about prachaar's etymology, still "propaganda" appealed to me, but I chose "proclamation" considering all the above factors.
    I guess political correctness got the better of me :)
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Note that some of the extreme right-wing organisation RSS's members, including India's current prime minister, are called by the RSS as "prachaarak" - the ones who do "prachaar". One can judge how "prachaar" is felt. It is not necessarily negative in its connotation, it merely means "publicity", but it can easily take on negative connotations. On no account, it can be the sense of "Jesus proclaimed as the Messiah". The English "propaganda" though in today's world has slid much into negative connotation territory, more than the verb "to propagate" has.
     
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