Hindi:He is very choosy about food.

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  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "woh khaane ke baare meN bohat meen-mekh nikaalta hai"

    You can substitute "ke baare meN" with other equivalent construction, such as "ko le kar".
     

    HindiMurkh

    Member
    Hindi & Gujarati
    I would also suggest the word aanaakAAnii. It means something along the lines of making excuses or doing things with hesitation.
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    I have never heard these two words "meen mekh and anakaani" before. Could you give more suggestions on how these words are used in different situations.
     

    HindiMurkh

    Member
    Hindi & Gujarati
    I have never heard these two words "meen mekh and anakaani" before. Could you give more suggestions on how these words are used in different situations.
    Something like: वह खाने में बहुत आनाकानी करता है|
    vah khane me bahut aanaakAAnii kartA hai.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Something like: वह खाने में बहुत आनाकानी करता है|
    vah khane me bahut aanaakAAnii kartA hai.
    But that doesn't mean to be choosy! It means rather he evades/tries to avoid eating food, and that's a very different thing.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I have never heard these two words "meen mekh and anakaani" before. Could you give more suggestions on how these words are used in different situations.
    "meen mekh nikaalnaa" - you can learn it as an idiom. It means to be fussy or choosy about something.

    "aanaa-kaanii karnaa" - that is something different (and not applicable here); it means to evade (doing something).
     

    bakshink

    Senior Member
    punjabi
    Meen-Mekh Nikalana- as far as I know is used for "finding faults in" food preparations but being choosy is being selective about what to eat and what not to eat, so I think नकचढ़ा is more appropriate.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Meen-Mekh Nikalana- as far as I know is used for "finding faults in" food preparations but being choosy is being selective about what to eat
    Agree on that; it's mostly used to mean to create a fuss about something, try to find faults. However, there is no real equivalent of "choosy" in Hindi, so that's the best option depending on context.

    and what not to eat, so I think नकचढ़ा is more appropriate.
    That wouldn't work at all: "nakchaRhaa", usually pejorative, means someone spoiled, haughty, etc.
     
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