Hindi: Punjabi influenced Hindi as spoken in Delhi

Akhri

New Member
English
Hi friends,

Could someone please provide with me typical Punjabi 'slang' as it is seen in the Hindi spoken around Delhi! I'd like to master that accent. :p

I'm referring to stuff like kardiyo instead of karo which I believe shows someone's Punjabi background!

I already learned Hindi!

Thanks!
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    ^ "kar diyo" is a very common UP construct, and I don't think it has anything to do with Punjabi. Also, "kar diyo" comes from "kar denaa", not "karo"/"karnaa".

    As for Punjabi-influenced Hindi in Delhi, I never heard much of anything like that while living in Delhi, except some words taken wholesale (e.g. "kuRii"). The grammar and slang in Hindi in the Delhi area are greatly influenced by western UP, rather.
     

    Akhri

    New Member
    English
    Oh thanks! I always thought it was due to Punjabi influence! Maybe because whenever I've interacted with 'real' people from Delhi they were Punjabis and I thought normally Delhiites spoke the proper Hindi as seen in movies. :p I thought it made sense because a lot of Punjabis came to Delhi after the partition I believe!

    Could you specificy this accent? Does it have a particular name?

    And could you provide more typical examples of slang in the Delhi Hindi due to this influence?

    Thank you!
     
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    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I don't know of any particular name for it; it's colloquial Hindi for me, not slang.

    As for examples, you will find many in films like "Run" (Vijay Raaz's character, even if he is shown to be coming to Delhi) - you will find clips on YouTube. For UP Hindi, you will find films like "Revolver Rani" to be good examples.

    I have never really seen Delhi Hindi to be different from western UP Hindi, so any examples that fit the latter also fit the former for me.
     

    tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    Hi friends,

    Could someone please provide with me typical Punjabi 'slang' as it is seen in the Hindi spoken around Delhi! I'd like to master that accent. :p

    I'm referring to stuff like kardiyo instead of karo which I believe shows someone's Punjabi background!

    I already learned Hindi!

    Thanks!


    I think the accent you may be refering to is the Punjabi accent. There are Punjabis that speak Hindi with a full-on Punjabi accent. On the other hand, I know a Punjabi who was born and raised in Delhi who sounds like a Hindi speaker even when speaking Punjabi...

    Stereotypical things Punjabis say in Hindi movies are "putar, haRipaa, bhale bhale (sp?), shaava shaava" etc
     

    hindiurdu

    Senior Member
    Hindi-Urdu, Punjabi, Kashmiri
    vela, puaaRaa, kakh (eg kakh nahi bachaa), yaaraa, kaakuu, DaaDaa (vo baRi DaaDii chiiz hai), gwaach, gwaanDi, puunje, khalaaraa. These are not slang really. Just Punjabi words. Delhi is pretty cosmopolitan, so Delhi Punjabis often tailor their language when they are around others. They get progressively more Punjabified when they're with others of that background. I've never heard balle-balle from any Punjabis in normal speech. They just say Balle (once). I have never heard haRiippaa outside of people dancing.

    There are many things from (East) Punjab that I never hear Delhi Punjabis say. Not sure it's because most Delhi Punjabis are from West Punjab or because they have just lost those expressions somewhere. One example is saying KiddaaN. Or the whole response of "Qaayam (actually, Qaim)" in response to how are you. And so on. I can tell a Delhi Punjabi pretty easily I feel like no matter how fluent their Punjabi.
     
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    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Dialogues in the movie "No One Killed Jessica" are a very good example Delhi Hindi, which is a mixture of several languages/dialects and has some typical Hindi expressions like 'kar diyo', as the movie is set in Delhi. Of course, the movie also teaches you a lot of vulgar Hindi abuses, which are part and parcel of Delhi life.:(
     

    hindiurdu

    Senior Member
    Hindi-Urdu, Punjabi, Kashmiri
    ^Kar diyo (kar diijyo, older people) or Kariyo is West UP speak. Not Punjabi at all. However, Delhi has a massive West UP influence. In fact, this style of speech might be native to the territory also. Tere ko > Ter-ko, Mere-ko > Mer-ko. Na'ii Be. Pareshaan > Preshaan (common with Punjabi). Tukk hi nahiin hai (often Tukk'ii'ni'ai at speed) meaning it makes no sense to me. Rehen de. Auqaat mein reh ('Qaat'me'rai). It's all actually West UP speak.

    However, I have noticed that a lot of non-Punjabis are confused by this. It might be that the lilt of Haryanvi and Western Khariboli sounds a bit Punjabi to non-Punjabis. Possible. It is also possible that it is in fact Punjabi inflected and I can't detect it because I perceive it as non-Punjabi. Possible.
     
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    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^Kar diyo (kar diijyo, older people) or Kariyo is West UP speak. Not Punjabi at all. However, Delhi has a massive West UP influence. In fact, this style of speech might be native to the territory also. Tere ko > Ter-ko, Mere-ko > Mer-ko. Na'ii Be. Pareshaan > Preshaan (common with Punjabi). Tukk hi nahiin hai (often Tukk'ii'ni'ai at speed) meaning it makes no sense to me. Rehen de. Auqaat mein reh ('Qaat'me'rai). It's all actually West UP speak.

    However, I have noticed that a lot of non-Punjabis are confused by this. It might be that the lilt of Haryanvi and Western Khariboli sounds a bit Punjabi to non-Punjabis. Possible. It is also possible that it is in fact Punjabi inflected and I can't detect it because I perceive it as non-Punjabi. Possible.
    I agree with your post. Actually it does exist in older Urdu (dijiyo, diyo), also in Hariyanvi speech but there is also mat jaa'iyo in Standard Urdu (more popular some decades ago) for the 2nd pers. sg., so I think it has been native to Dehli.
     

    hindiurdu

    Senior Member
    Hindi-Urdu, Punjabi, Kashmiri
    Actually, separately, there is something interesting with Haryanvi (to me). There's a strong pattern of stressing and tonality when Haryanvi is spoken which is very distinct from the Khari of West UP and Delhi. And when you move westwards from Haryana, this pattern disappears as you enter Punjab. Maajhi lacks it (of course, it's still very tonal, but lacks this Haryanvi haulii-uchchii thing). And then it reappears as you go further west in PoThohaari. I do hear it in Rajasthani and Gojri also, but it is completely missing in Kashmiri and only a small percentage of Dogri speakers seem to have it (Gojri/Pothwari influence?). Not quite sure what to call it, but it feels very distinct to me. Delhi-proximate Haryanvis switch it on-and-off depending on who's talking to them also. I wonder if groups in West UP that intermarry with Haryanvis (Jats and Gujjars mainly) have it too ....

    One more thing. I have noticed that Haryanvi seems to also have half-vowels like Kashmiri. The more rural the person is, the more pronounced they are. Punjabi, Hindi, Urdu lack it too. Is this documented somewhere? And there is a distinct pattern where Haryanvis seem to regularize the vowels when they talk to others. Then there are other patterns. JaaRaa (cold) > zaaDDaa/dzaaDDaa. Jaantaa/jaantii huun (I know) > ↓Zaanuu ↓uun. The arrow indicates emphasis - the second feels like the same thing as deaspiration+tone for Punjabi but what the heck is that first one? I see people change (code-switch?) from Haryanvi to Standard H-U as they turn from person to person in a single conversation.
     
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