Hindi, Punjabi, Urdu: Lukewarm, warm

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Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
In Punjabi, "warm" is "kosaa". What is the equivalent word in Urdu/Hindi? And is Lukewarm the same as warm? I know "Morris Dancing" does n't mean someone called Morris dancing away but who is Luke anyway!?:)
 
  • Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    We use both niim garm and kunkunaa.

    In fact, in my family I've heard gungunaa a lot too! ... and we use kunkunaa / gungunaa much more than niim garm. The latter we tend to reserve for more literary usage.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    If I ever heard that I'd think you were requesting some زیرِ لب غناء:)
    I knew someone would come up with this! Yes. we do have gungunaanaa from which the imperative (informal) would be gungunaa! The context would tell you what was meant. Tepid water or a request / command to start humming!
    I remember you mentioning a while back that you’ve never been to Lucknow! :) There you would hear both. Not sure if it is still true. Amongst the older generation one might still find both forms being used.
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    I knew someone would come up with this!...
    BP...faithfully fulfilling the taqdiir.

    ...The context would tell you what was meant. Tepid water or a request / command to start humming!
    ...
    Of course. A joke's tashriiH is never as funny.

    ...
    I remember you mentioning a while back that you’ve never been to Lucknow! :) There you would hear both. Not sure if it is still true. Amongst the older generation one might still find both forms being used.
    India is still on my list of tourist destinations. Maybe someday I will be able to say I've been to Lakhnauu.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I just thought I would ask any of the Hindi speakers to chime in on this old thread. Greatbearji said, in Hindi, lukewarm is 'gungunaa' (which I always thought meant the buzzing of a mosquito!)

    What would urban Hindi speakers say in the following cases:

    - In Goldilocks, there's hot porridge, cold porridge, and warm porridge. (Is gungunii daliya the right word?)
    - The rice is soaking in warm water. Chaaval gungune paani mein bheeg rahaa hai (Ok, I made up bheegna. I don't know that the 'non-causative' of bhigona is)
    - The weather is warm outside-- not too hot, not too cold. Mausum gungunaa hai? That sounds very unidiomatic...
    - Her forehead is feeling warm. She must have a temperature. Uska maatha gungunaa lag rahaa hai. Usko zukaam hoga.

    Thank you for your help.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    PS. If gungunaa is lukewarm, is there a better word for warm in Hindi? Do we use kosa, as per the above?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "garm" (or "garam") means "warm" in Hindi (also "hot", but in that case, usually intensified with "bahut" or some other word). Some Hindi users might be using "kosaa", but I have never heard it.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I still struggle with 'warm,' despite @littlepond ji's kind response.

    For example: This hat will keep you warm. You should wear it.

    Yeh topii tumheN garam kar degii (not even sure that's the right verb, but besides the point...) -- that's almost a counter argument for wearing the hat (i.e. take it off because you'll get hot.).

    Any thoughts?

    Many thanks again.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    For example: This hat will keep you warm. You should wear it.
    "yeh Topii tum ko garm rakhegii, tumheN ise paihan lenaa chaahiye"

    Which verb you use is actually important! "kar denaa" would imply here something you shouldn't do (esp. intensified by "denaa"), whereas "rakhnaa" is neutral and just saying that's what will happen (retaining, keeping). ("karnaa" would also be neutral, but then you are asking for retaining warmth, which is "rakhnaa".)
     
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    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Thank you. In particular for the notes on the verb usage. Most helpful.

    Not to belabor the point, but what's the idiomatic way of saying 'my hands are hot/cold (at this moment in time)?'

    Mere haath thande haiN doesn't sound right, I don't think.

    Mere haath thande lagte haiN is what I think I would say, but wanted to check.

    I suppose if I were to generally talk about my feet always being cold, I think it's more likely to be 'mere haath thande rehte haiN'

    Is that all vaguely correct?
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    amiramir said:
    Mere haath thande haiN doesn't sound right, I don't think.
    It actually is correct.
    • mere haath ThanDe/sard/yax haiN.
    • mere haath garm/tatte haiN.
    amiramir said:
    I suppose if I were to generally talk about my feet always being cold, I think it's more likely to be 'mere haath thande rehte haiN'
    That is correct.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Qureshpor said:
    In Punjabi, "warm" is "kosaa". What is the equivalent word in Urdu/Hindi?
    Platts, Farhang-e-Asifiyyah, and Urdu Lughat list سسم सुसुम. It might be more common/familiar in Hindi?

    There is also سہتا سہتا - sahtaa sahtaa.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "mere haath ThanDe haiN" is fine; "mere haath ThanDe paR gaye haiN" is also fine. "mere haath ThanDe raihte haiN" is fine.

    If one is describing numb and cold, or lifeless, then one could use "shithil".

    I have never heard "susum" used by any Hindi speaker.

    For hot, "garm"/"garam" is fine. If too hot, "mere haath jal rahe haiN".
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    There are Hindi search matches (including dictionary entries) for सुसुम online. However, it seems to be used more in Bhojpuri.
     

    bakshink

    Senior Member
    punjabi
    Halka garam or thoda garam are also used and well understood. Tez garam for very hot and for boiling hot Khaulata hua are used. In spoken Hindi very few people use words exclusively of Hindi/Sanskrit origin. Ushna is another word that comes to my mind.
    उष्ण जल स्त्रोत- Hot water spring and उष्णकटिबंध- Tropical, but I doubt if one can use 'Ushna for Porridge or tea.
     

    Frau Moore

    Member
    Deutsch
    When I just looked up "shīr" in Platt´s dictionary I also found "shīr-garm, adj. 'Milk-warm,' lukewarm" .

    Is shīr-garm ever used in everyday language? And if yes in which context? Only for liquids? Or also for food? Or maybe even for other objects?
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    littlepond said:
    I have never heard "susum" used by any Hindi speaker.
    desi4life said:
    There are Hindi search matches (including dictionary entries) for सुसुम online. However, it seems to be used more in Bhojpuri.
    Thanks for the information about susum.
    Frau Moore said:
    When I just looked up "shīr" in Platt´s dictionary I also found "shīr-garm, adj. 'Milk-warm,' lukewarm" .

    Is shīr-garm ever used in everyday language? And if yes in which context? Only for liquids? Or also for food? Or maybe even for other objects?
    It is less common, especially in comparison to niim-garm. The two literary examples here in Urdu Lughat are of shiir-garm paanii. Here is an example of shiir-garm roTii:
    اصل ذائقہ اس سنہری، سوندھی، سانولی، شیر گرم روٹی میں ہوتا ہے جو چنگیر میں رکھی ہو تو یوں دمکتی ہے جیسے سونے کی تھالی۔

    آمنہ مفتی از کالم "اڑیں گے پرزے"
     
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    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    In A.R.Rahman's "Barso Re" song (from the 2007 movie "Guru"), the singer says repeatedly (celebrating rain)

    miiThaa hai kosaa hai
    baarish kaa bosaa hai


    and I am struggling to find any Hindi/Urdu headword.
    But in Punjabi, it seems to exist:

    Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 4.54.19 PM.png
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    In A.R.Rahman's "Barso Re" song (from the 2007 movie "Guru"), the singer says repeatedly (celebrating rain)

    miiThaa hai kosaa hai
    baarish kaa bosaa hai
    And that's why it is a poorly written song for the film: suddenly a rural Gujarat girl is singing with words such as "kosaa" and "bosaa", both words utterly unfamiliar in Gujarat.
     
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