Hindi: Same

luoruosi

Member
usa
english - america
The dictionary definition of "same" in Hindi is "samaan" but how would that work in a sentence? For example, "We like the same things" and "We have the same name".

"Hame samaan kuchh pasand hai"?
"Hamaare naam samaan hai"/ "Hamaaraa ek hii naam hai"?
 
  • Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Which dictionary was that, @luoruosi ?

    To my knowledge, there is no single word in Hindi that has the same meaning as the English word 'same'. Like you, I'm a student of the language, though, so perhaps someone else will chime in who is more informed.

    If I wanted to say your English sentence in Hindi, I would have translated it thusly:
    We like the same things

    mujhe vahi cheeze.n pasand hai jo aapko pasand hai

    Very curious to hear other forum members on this one.
     

    luoruosi

    Member
    usa
    english - america
    Which dictionary was that, @luoruosi ?

    To my knowledge, there is no single word in Hindi that has the same meaning as the English word 'same'. Like you, I'm a student of the language, though, so perhaps someone else will chime in who is more informed.

    If I wanted to say your English sentence in Hindi, I would have translated it thusly:
    We like the same things

    mujhe vahi cheeze.n pasand hai jo aapko pasand hai

    Very curious to hear other forum members on this one.
    Pretty much every single Hindi-English dictionary website has the word "samaan" as one of, or the top definition of "same," but i've never heard it used before.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    सभी पुरुषों को समान बनाया जाता है
    (one of the "self-evident principles" from the US declaration of independence, that all men are created equal).
    In this case, it is used as a pure qualificative adjective, not as a comparative nexus.

    I believe "ke samaan" used as a comparative nexus ("as, like") is also possible.
    For example, there is one lecture, I believe about Mahadev Desai (an assistant of Ghandi), called शुक्रतारे के समान (like Venus), that is all over the Internet.

    It is true that in Hindi there is a wide variety of idiomatic expressions used to express comparative equality. As I don't speak the language, I can't speak as to their relative frequency versus समान and के समान.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "Hame samaan kuchh pasand hai"?
    "Hamaare naam samaan hai"/ "Hamaaraa ek hii naam hai"?
    "hame ek samaan chiizeN pasand haiN"
    "hamaare naam ek samaan haiN"

    The suggestion "mujhe vahi cheezeN pasand hai jo aapko pasand haiN" is also fine.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    We like the same things" and "We have the same name".
    What about these?

    हमें /हम लोगों को/ एक जैसी चीज़ें पसंद हैं. /hameN or ham logoN ko ek jaisii chizeN pasaNd haiN/ 'We like the same things.'

    हमारे एक जैसे नाम हैं. /hamaare ek jaise naam haiN/ 'We have the same name.' ,
    or,
    मेरा उसका एक-(जै)सा नाम है. /meraa uskaa ek-(jai)saa naam hai/ 'We have the same name.'
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I would say that "ek jaisaa" is "similar" rather than "same", but, given that people often use "same" for "similar", it indeed works.
     

    Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I've never heard anyone say 'samaan', nor have I ever heard it in a Bollywood movie/other Hindi media, and I can't help but note it's very close to 'sammaan'/honour (which I have heard in media often). On the other hand, as a non-native speaker, there are all kinds of holes in my knowledge. Is it a commonly used word in speech? Is it a higher register, or common but mainly written? Just curious if anyone could shed a little more light on its usage, thanks.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I've never heard anyone say 'samaan', nor have I ever heard it in a Bollywood movie/other Hindi media, and I can't help but note it's very close to 'sammaan'/honour (which I have heard in media often). On the other hand, as a non-native speaker, there are all kinds of holes in my knowledge. Is it a commonly used word in speech? Is it a higher register, or common but mainly written? Just curious if anyone could shed a little more light on its usage, thanks.
    It's a very commonly used word, though more in writing than in speech: that does not mean it is not used in speech. For a Hindi ear, "samaan" (similar, same) and "sammaan" (honour) sound worlds apart.

    Bollywood is based in Mumbai and is also influenced by Urdu a lot: it often does not reflect the Hindi spoken in Rajasthan, many places of UP, etc. (and here I don't mean to refer to Marwari, Awadhi, etc.). Even today, when many films with a story set in UP have started to get made, the trend is towards slang and swear words to give a ring of authenticity (though they fail to), and not the speech of a typical UP person.
     

    swatshak

    New Member
    Hindi/Urdu
    I would say that "ek jaisaa" is "similar" rather than "same", but, given that people often use "same" for "similar", it indeed works.
    While "ek jaisi" is often used to indicate similarity, "bilkul ek jaisi" removes all doubt from the phrasing; therefore, "बिल्कुल एक जैसी चीज़ें पसंद हैं" is also correct.
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindi
    The dictionary definition of "same" in Hindi is "samaan" but how would that work in a sentence? For example, "We like the same things" and "We have the same name".

    "Hame samaan kuchh pasand hai"?
    "Hamaare naam samaan hai"/ "Hamaaraa ek hii naam hai"?
    It seems that @luorosi's final proposed translation (hamaaraa ek hii naam hai) hasn't gotten much comment...? For what it's worth, I like the use of ek hii for "We have the same name." The (bilkul) ek jaisaa/samaan stuff sounds fine too, but I think ek hii is probably what I would have said in this context.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    It seems that @luorosi's final proposed translation (hamaaraa ek hii naam hai) hasn't gotten much comment...? For what it's worth, I like the use of ek hii for "We have the same name." The (bilkul) ek jaisaa/samaan stuff sounds fine too, but I think ek hii is probably what I would have said in this context.
    hamaaraa ek hii naam hai = We have the same name

    But this can also mean: We only have one name

    So, there is ambiguity in this construction.

    "We like the same things" = ham ek-jaisii/ek sii chiizeN pasand karte haiN.
    "We have the same name" = hamaaraa ek-saa naam hai.
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindi
    hamaaraa ek hii naam hai = We have the same name

    But this can also mean: We only have one name

    So, there is ambiguity in this construction.
    Fair enough! :) Though probably in any real life situation, this ambiguity would be resolved from context.
     
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